Author Topic: EW clutch  (Read 741 times)

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Offline tck

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EW clutch
« on: 23 May 2023 at 11:03 »
Is there anywhere a decent exploded drawing of how an EW clutch goes together in particular the operating lever position and what ts ramps rotate against?  I have all the parts and I did  a few years ago change the 4 springs  but as I did not take it fully apart  this time  I am a bit lost. 'The book of the douglas' is of little help

Offline Red

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Re: EW clutch
« Reply #1 on: 23 May 2023 at 14:17 »
This may help. See pages 19 to 21

Roy

Douglas-EW-Manual.pdf



Cover image added, manual file converted from attachment to linked file - Dave, 27May2023
« Last Edit: 26 May 2023 at 21:01 by Dave »

Offline tck

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Re: EW clutch
« Reply #2 on: 23 May 2023 at 21:27 »
Thanks for that Red I am sure that will help me in a lot of things much better than my other literature
Unfortunately I still cannot see the answer to my big puzzle the 'ramps' on the face of the operating arm must act on something  protruding to work the clutch inwards. I can see nothing between the crankcase face and the sprocket that it could act on (I do have the ball bearing carrier that sits there) but what engages with the circular ramps on the lever?
I do wish I had seen it taken apart

Offline cycarmark

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Re: EW clutch
« Reply #3 on: 23 May 2023 at 23:01 »
Here is a picture of the engine of my B29, hopefully the clutch mechanism is similar to your EW.  The clutch release slides against the three screws that are screwed into the crankcase, they are located around the main bearing in this photo.  Hope this helps.

Offline tck

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Re: EW clutch
« Reply #4 on: 24 May 2023 at 08:11 »
Ah! so thats the missing link! thank you so much cycarmark I am sure those screws are here somewhere  now I know what to look for

Offline eddie

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Re: EW clutch
« Reply #5 on: 24 May 2023 at 08:51 »
Tim,
        It is a neat fitting steel ring with three headed pins and three rollers. The back of the ring has 3 slots (close together), and the crankcase should have a single pin to engage with one of the slots - you have to select which slot provides the best adjustment for the clutch. The basic principal is the same as that used on the postwar machines, except that you turn the whole assembly for the adjustment, rather than just adjusting the operating arm.

  Hope that makes sense,
                                      Regards,
                                                   Eddie.

Offline tck

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Re: EW clutch
« Reply #6 on: 24 May 2023 at 17:53 »
That caused some panic until I found the ring in the box packing paper! there are 3 indents in the crankcase that take the part of the roller screws that protrudes inside the ring the indents are not at 12 oclock and twenty to and twenty past but are slewed with the top one at about 1 oclock and still 120deg apart there are no slots in the ring so I guess with this 1926 EW 350 that particular adjustment has been fixed
Thanks Eddie

Offline Doug

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Re: EW clutch
« Reply #7 on: 24 May 2023 at 21:14 »
Tim,

The arrangement described by Eddie is slightly later than the EW, the rollers were introduced with the S6 models or certainly had appeared by then. The EW use solid pins, slightly smaller than the subsequent rollers. 5/16 inch if I remember correctly, but same diameter as the fine thread through the ring which you located. The pins have domed ends and thread through the ring and into those dimples in the aluminum hub that you noted. That stops the ring from slipping around. The other end has a screw driver slot to drive them home.

The solid pins tend to develop flats rather quickly. This does not seem to impede the action at all on the throw out cam ramps, but it does quickly add slack to the clutch cable.

When they first went to the rollers, the ring only had one groove. Presumably they adjusted the location of the ring and then drilled and tapped for the stop pin. Later they added a sequence of grooves to allow adjustment, or more flexibility at the factory for initial setting if the stop pin was installed in advance. I suspect the latter as the clutch linings wear slowly so once the problem of flats on the solid pins were eliminated the need for gross adjustments with the ring ex-factory was mostly eliminated. Unless one is swapping parts about from various sources.

This is the solid pin type. This is a 600EW, but it is the same for the 350EW, right down to the part numbers.







This is the roller style described by Eddie, with examples of one, three and four adjustment grooves:





-Doug