Author Topic: TS Steering head cone  (Read 1107 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Marcus

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Join Date: Sep 2021
  • Posts: 81
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
TS Steering head cone
« on: 02 Feb 2023 at 04:55 »
Hi,

I am still working on disassembling my steering head. I assume that the top cone with the Red Arrow in the photo should be a sliding fit, mine is absolutely solid at the moment. I have applied heat and then when cooled applied plenty of aircraft penetrating fluid, but I just want to make sure before I apply more heat and try my hydraulic press that there is nothing else that is likely to be holding it in place.

Many Thanks
Marcus


Offline Rob

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Join Date: Jan 2006
  • Posts: 98
  • Location: Melbourne, Australia
Re: TS Steering head cone
« Reply #1 on: 02 Feb 2023 at 23:24 »
Marcus,

You are correct. It is a sliding fit. There should be the half of the ball bearing race inside but that is also a sliding fit.

Rob

Offline Marcus

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Join Date: Sep 2021
  • Posts: 81
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: TS Steering head cone
« Reply #2 on: 03 Feb 2023 at 00:28 »
Thanks Rob,

I'll have another go at it over the weekend.

Cheers

Marcus

Offline douglas1947

  • Master Member
  • ****
  • Join Date: Feb 2014
  • Posts: 518
  • Location: Germany
Re: TS Steering head cone
« Reply #3 on: 03 Feb 2023 at 09:31 »
Markus,

if you are shure you do not use the upper cup anymore, may be you can better crack it?

Michael

Offline eddie

  • Master Member
  • ****
  • Join Date: Mar 2006
  • Posts: 1859
  • Location: Hampshire, UK
Re: TS Steering head cone
« Reply #4 on: 03 Feb 2023 at 12:44 »
Marcus,
           Start by cleaning the rust and rubbish out of the slot in the head stem (there is probably a key or peg to prevent the bearing from turning on the stem). With the stem cleaned up, add some penetrating oil, then using a piece of steel tube over the stem, try driving the bearing further on, before trying to remove it. (Much like trying to remove a rusty nail from a piece of wood, driving it further in usually makes it easier to remove!).

   Regards,
                 Eddie.

Offline Marcus

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Join Date: Sep 2021
  • Posts: 81
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: TS Steering head cone
« Reply #5 on: 04 Feb 2023 at 04:43 »
Success ! well at last in getting it apart.

Thanks to everyone who made suggestions, I used a bit of all of them, hit both sides with 2 hammers at once a few times, put wedges in the gap, applied some gentle heat and then start to tap on the top of the tube, once it started it was plain sailing.

Now I just need to deal with the state of the cones and balls as they are all shot. It appears the balls are 3/16 diameter and I will try the various local bike shops and see if I can get any suitable cones but if anyone can suggest where else would have them please sing out

Thanks again
Marcus


Offline eddie

  • Master Member
  • ****
  • Join Date: Mar 2006
  • Posts: 1859
  • Location: Hampshire, UK
Re: TS Steering head cone
« Reply #6 on: 04 Feb 2023 at 09:06 »
If the 2 halves of the top bearing are identical, it looks as if they are the same as used on later prewar (and early postwar) machines. In which case, the part number is 2016. This was a standard bearing track, but is now obsolete, so may take a bit of finding.

   Regards,
                Eddie.

Offline GlenDouglas

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Join Date: May 2016
  • Posts: 44
  • Location: Lincoln, UK
Re: TS Steering head cone
« Reply #7 on: 05 Mar 2023 at 09:52 »
Marcus bearing cones should pop out. The problem piece is the top half. I ended up machining the cup piece out the top. If memory serves I got head race set from Douglas club and fitted with machining work. Regards Glen

Offline eddie

  • Master Member
  • ****
  • Join Date: Mar 2006
  • Posts: 1859
  • Location: Hampshire, UK
Re: TS Steering head cone
« Reply #8 on: 05 Mar 2023 at 10:48 »
If the top half is damaged beyond further use, the easy way of getting it out is to put a run of arc weld on the track - wait for it to cool, then as it contracts, it should fall out!

  Regards,
                Eddie.

Offline Marcus

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Join Date: Sep 2021
  • Posts: 81
  • Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Re: TS Steering head cone
« Reply #9 on: 05 Mar 2023 at 19:38 »
Hi Eddie,

Thanks for that suggestion, but I was able to knock them both out without any problems as there was just enough hanging out to be able to get a drift on the edge.

Cheers

Marcus