Author Topic: Mark 1V alloy stand spring  (Read 572 times)

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Offline franky

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Mark 1V alloy stand spring
« on: 13 Jul 2021 at 11:20 »
I am fitting an alloy stand purchased from the LDMCC and asking where does the coil spring mount to the frame. The spring supplied has a small eye which I assume goes on the stand finger. The other eye is much larger and at right angles to the small one. Perhaps I have a frame lug missing or I need to create a plate which mounts to the base of the battery mount.Got me beat at the moment.
Any assistance would be appreciated.

Offline DJS

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Re: Mark 1V alloy stand spring
« Reply #1 on: 13 Jul 2021 at 12:15 »
Hi Frank,

Iíve just responded to your email and hope that it helps!

All the best,

David

Offline eddie

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Re: Mark 1V alloy stand spring
« Reply #2 on: 13 Jul 2021 at 15:11 »
Franky,
             There should be a tag on the back of the battery carrier to anchor the spring. The tag is made from 1/2" x 1/8" steel flat, and is positioned 1ĺ" above the lower battery carrier fixing bolt, and stands off the carrier by 1/2". The stand should have a 1/4" BSF bolt and nut for the other end of the spring (the spring does not hook into the arm on the stand).

    Regards,
                  Eddie.

Offline franky

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Re: Mark 1V alloy stand spring
« Reply #3 on: 13 Jul 2021 at 23:38 »
Thanks DJS for your email reply and to you Eddie for the detail in your reply as well.
Four years ago when I was repairing the battery holder with a hammer and oxy set in the shed I wondered about the tab with the hole and then thought nothing of it for all this time. Incredible, that which is in plain sight is often invisible.

Eddie, forgive me if I have said this already.
I consulted the forum some years ago and followed your recipe to the letter regarding the mark four crankshaft rebuild. I tried a number of specialist machine shops in the Sydney basin to no avail and following advice from a close friend went to a well known machine shop in the Kelso industrial estate. I had known about them for many years but reluctant to go there as often you get chased out of the workshop if you want fiddly motorcycle jobs done. Armed with your forum specifications, the new bearings, my separated crank with original pins and conrods, we had a brief conversation with lots of nodding. I left, quickly before he could change his mind. This visit was fortuitous as it was close to home and they were able to expose their apprentice to a rare multi faceted machining job. What was presented back to me was nothing short of industrial art. Peterís only comment  was that he was a bit surprised at the hardness of the conrods which had to be ground a touch to accept the bearings. He said that he had never encountered anything like them before.
I am using this opportunity to thank you for the original post detail which I believe is the sole reason they took on the job.

Offline Neville Heath

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Re: Mark 1V alloy stand spring
« Reply #4 on: 14 Jul 2021 at 10:51 »
Hi Franky
Stretching the spring on is tricky. This makes it easier.
Neville



Image cropped and converted to linked file - Dave, 15Jul2021
« Last Edit: 14 Jul 2021 at 19:42 by Dave »

Offline franky

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Re: Mark 1V alloy stand spring
« Reply #5 on: 15 Jul 2021 at 04:35 »
Thanks Neville. Great looking tool. I attached the spring late yesterday, first trying a fine strong rope. I have a long shaft flat blade screwdriver and an old stainless bicycle spoke which I fashioned an eye at one end and a hook at the other. The 12mm tip was wedged under the stand and while laying down on the job stretched the spring and pushed the eye towards the handle end until it synched. The spring end was then tapped in over the fine copper tube I made to act as a bearing. My reaction at the time "well bugger me that was easy".

Offline Neville Heath

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Re: Mark 1V alloy stand spring
« Reply #6 on: 21 Jul 2021 at 10:42 »
Franky
I guess bikes being upside down where you live makes it easier to get at!
Neville

Offline franky

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Re: Mark 1V alloy stand spring
« Reply #7 on: 22 Jul 2021 at 11:22 »
Your right Neville tis easy as we are downunder.
I was hoping to engage you re my mark's front end. Did you publish on the forum or in the Conrod a positive fix re curing fork oil leaks? If so are you able to steer me in the direction of issue number or link that would be much appreciated, Frank.