Author Topic: Petrol connecting pipe  (Read 961 times)

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Offline Sgtbiro

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Petrol connecting pipe
« on: 08 May 2021 at 09:25 »
Hi Getting very close to getting my Dragonfly on the road just need a few more bits and bobs. one problem i am having is sourcing a petrol tank connecting pipe the one that connects the two half's of the petrol tank together, i cant get the parts anywhere but i have noticed that on a lot of photos of Dragonfly's people have adapted and made there own, so could someone that has done this please advise me on what to do and parts i will require as i do not have any including what connections i will need .   

Cheers Kevin..     

Offline patrickwhitty

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Re: Petrol connecting pipe
« Reply #1 on: 08 May 2021 at 09:56 »
Here are a couple of photos of the underside of my Dragonfly's tank. It is just a plastic tube clipped to a screwed connector at each end. Presumably the pipes coming out of the tank are threaded. I've never taken the pipe off and the picture in the spare parts booklet isn't helpful.
« Last Edit: 08 May 2021 at 10:05 by patrickwhitty »

Offline eddie

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Re: Petrol connecting pipe
« Reply #2 on: 08 May 2021 at 11:37 »
You can make up a pipe (as in the previous posting), but the original pipe on the Dragonfly was copper with the conical end fittings silver soldered on. I prefer the copper version as it is less likely to be easily damaged by any heat. Remember, if you do have a problem with the pipe being heat damaged, there is no facility to turn off the supply - with the prospect of up to 5 gallons of fuel spilling onto a hot engine - doesn't bear thinking about!!!!

  Regards,
                 Eddie.

Offline patrickwhitty

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Re: Petrol connecting pipe
« Reply #3 on: 08 May 2021 at 18:00 »
Coincidently, there is a new Youtube video about sealing a Dragonfly tank (actually, most of it is about the tank sealing kit) which shows the connecting tube quite clearly. It is a real copper version. And you are quite right, Eddie. A problem with the crispy old plastic pipe of unknown vintage doesn't really bear thinking about.  I'll make a copper replacement.

Offline Daren W Australia

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Re: Petrol connecting pipe
« Reply #4 on: 08 May 2021 at 22:50 »
2.30 in to vid shows fuel cross over pipe www.youtube.com/watch?v=7tX74Df_Z0Y
too many dougli not enough time!

Offline Sgtbiro

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Re: Petrol connecting pipe
« Reply #5 on: 09 May 2021 at 16:58 »
Thanks for all the info guys yer i think Eddie is right its not worth thinking about if you get a leak in one of the pipes, so back to the my problem i dont have the relevant skills or the parts to make a copper one so was wondering if anyone can make me one up or knows of someone who can i would be very grateful, obviously i would be willing to pay for this service.

Cheers Kevin.. 

   

Offline EW-Ron

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Re: Petrol connecting pipe
« Reply #6 on: 09 May 2021 at 22:33 »
Now I don't know the fittings on your tank, but this looks a possibility ?

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/253804443585

You can also buy kits of parts to do same - pipe and fittings.
In various sizes.

Any plumber or gasfitter could adjust it to length.
Although you might want to get a quote first.
They might want to charge a minimum, or a full hour, even if its 5 minutes work ...

Offline Alan

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Re: Petrol connecting pipe
« Reply #7 on: 10 May 2021 at 01:09 »
Here in Aus, for any vehicle pipe work ( brakes, clutch, fuel, copper, flexible, high temp racing or normal), I often use Pirtek a hydraulic vehicle specialist and as long as they have or are given the correct end fittings they seem to enjoy making small specialised parts to your design at a reasonable price. Alternatively, a local workshop that works on classic cars should have the pipe work clamping tools etc and be familiar with the fittings as they would be doing this work all the time.

Offline eddie

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Re: Petrol connecting pipe
« Reply #8 on: 10 May 2021 at 06:32 »
The balance pipe fittings (in the bottom of the tank) are the same as those where the fuel pipe connects to the petrol tap.

   Eddie.

Offline patrickwhitty

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Re: Petrol connecting pipe
« Reply #9 on: 10 May 2021 at 06:43 »
The Lister engine pipe looks interesting, though a bit long. The distance between the tank connections is 4 inches with a drop of, say, 2 inches. The Pirtek route seems like a good idea too, provided you have the end fittings. I have a roll 1/4 inch copper pipe and a small size pipe bender so forming the pipe itself isn't a problem. My tank is getting low, I'll drain it this afternoon and make up a new pipe, and throw away the potentially lethal plastic tube. I can re-use the ends but to make a complete new tube would require the threaded connectors and the ends of the pipe will need to be formed. I'll let you know how I get on.

Offline patrickwhitty

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Re: Petrol connecting pipe
« Reply #10 on: 10 May 2021 at 16:48 »
The old and the new. 8 inches of 1/4 inch copper pipe, two nuts borrowed from an 8mm straight connector which are a perfect fit on the pipes below the fuel tank. Two little end pieces turned out of 3/8 brass bar. They need finishing and brazing or silver soldering to the pipe. Cost? Nothing, just an hour or two fooling about in the garage. I had all the bits available. Alternatively, and possibly a more respectable solution, Feked have 1/4 inch fuel pipe spigots complete with nuts at 4 pounds each plus postage; but I might find them cheaper elsewhere. However; when I removed the pipe I found that one end, and the pipe leading from reserve tank, were both completely blocked with a hardened varnish-like substance. All the time I have been riding around knowing I had a gallon in reserve I was not mistaken. But I wouldn't have been able to use it, short of laying the bike on its side so the petrol would slop over the hump. Having (nearly) sorted out a connecting pipe I shall have to take the tank off and clean it out. I think in future I shall run on the reserve tank on a frequent basis to keep it open and flowing.

Offline patrickwhitty

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Re: Petrol connecting pipe
« Reply #11 on: 18 May 2021 at 16:32 »
The new pipe is made up, fitted and petrol tight. As I removed the tank the old plastic pipe snapped off, not really desirable. The new pipe is 8 mm copper pipe. The ends are 1/4" petrol pipe nuts and spigots 1/4" nut 1/4" tube bought from Burton Bike Bits. The spigots are ribbed for plastic pipe so I turned the final ridges off and they are then a very tight fit into the 8mm pipe. The first one I made up I used Evostik super epoxy because I couldn't find my silver solder, but that wasn't at all successful. Finally the spigots are silver soldered into the pipe ends (I actually managed to put the nuts on, the right way round, before soldering the spigots). Bending the pipe was difficult using the pipe bending tool and it tended to crush at the bends. It was also difficult to get the bends in the right places and the legs at the right angle, without which it was very hard getting the thing to fit. I have made another pipe since (several, in fact) using a wooden former with a more gentle curve which brings the legs to exactly the right place every time and the pipe doesn't collapse so badly. I'll finish a second pipe off using the spare ends and fit it sometime when the tank is low. For now I need the bike back on the road.
The outlet from the tank on the far side of the frame was totally blocked and had to be drilled out. After that I washed the tank with de-greaser. As far as I could see there was very little rust and I didn't seal it. Now I just have to finish getting the headlamp nacelle re-fitted ready for using the bike tomorrow.
Getting the ends is not a problem. By lucky chance I happened to have a roll of 8 mm pipe sitting around from something else I was doing years ago. If anyone needs to make up a connector but feels reluctant to buy a roll of pipe I would be happy to send 6" of pipe, bent or unbent. Maybe in exchange for the postage.
Patrick

Offline EW-Ron

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Re: Petrol connecting pipe
« Reply #12 on: 18 May 2021 at 22:10 »
OR, you could fit petrol taps to all those fittings, and run a series of reserve supplies !?!
Easy to remove the tank too.

A certain flat twin of teutonic origins has no connection between the 2 sides of the tank.
The handbook mentions that if you are becoming fuel deficient after reserve, if you lean the bike right over
fuel will slosh from one side to the other, and you may proceed again. Only a litre or so ...

Offline patrickwhitty

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Re: Petrol connecting pipe
« Reply #13 on: 20 May 2021 at 17:00 »
Fitting taps to all those outlets might be a bit extreme, the tank would begin to look like a cow being milked. But maybe one tap each side, and a stop end on the third outlet; that would give you a really good reserve. And, as you say, there would be one less job to do when removing the tank. Having spent ages fooling about with bits of pipe that would seem a much better arrangement.
Patrick