Author Topic: 1913 Brake and Drivetrain question  (Read 9148 times)

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Offline spandau

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1913 Brake and Drivetrain question
« on: 12 Sep 2005 at 14:04 »
I have a few questions about my Model-1913

- The rear brake pad is missing.  Can someone suggest a material to use for making a new one? How is it attached to the holder?  There are no mounting holes in the brake lever casting. 

- There is a spring holding the brake lever off of the wheel pulley. What retains the brake lever in the other direction?  Is there supposed to be a stop (or spring) to keep the brake pedal from rotating too far backwards (under pressure from the rear spring)?

- My drive belt is worn and beginning to slip.  Can someone tell me the correct dimensions for a replacement? Is there a supplier of these belts?

- Both the engine and rear hub are locked into position.  The gearbox is the only thing that is adjustable (front to back).  How do I adjust the tension of the drive belt (gearbox to wheel pulley) without affecting the tension on the drive chain (engine to gearbox)?

Any help is appreciated.

Regards,
Steve

Offline alwyn

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Re: 1913 Brake and Drivetrain question
« Reply #1 on: 12 Sep 2005 at 22:33 »
Hi Steve,
Can't answer your questions but I am sure answers will be forthcoming from those who have the knowledge - what we would all be interested in is some photos of your project - don't wait until it's finished, work in-progress photos are welcomed. See HERE for guidance on how to post your photos.
Alwyn
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« Last Edit: 12 Sep 2005 at 22:38 by alwyn »
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Offline Ian

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Re: 1913 Brake and Drivetrain question
« Reply #2 on: 13 Sep 2005 at 00:10 »
Steve, with regard to your questions I can tell you what I do with my 23 model - sounds as though the actual brake pad housing may be different though

For the brake pad I have used a good hardwood moulded to the housing and the the belt rim. On mine the pad works on the inside V of the belt rim - is that the same on yours ? On my veteran triumph which works the other way it originally had rubber but we are just experimenting with modern brake material which we have shaped and bonded into the casting.

With regard to the belt tension I use a rubber V belt on my TS - and it has a joining link. If I ever need to adjust the tension I just cut a bit of belt off and refit the link !! You can also just buy different length continuous belts, get one close to the right size and adjust by adding or removing links from the primary chain. I will have a look tonight at the size of belt I use.

BTW where are you located ?

Offline spandau

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Re: 1913 Brake and Drivetrain question
« Reply #3 on: 13 Sep 2005 at 14:57 »
Here is a picture of the bike.  Itís mostly original, although slightly bastardized, with a mixture of parts from different 13í and 14í models.  Iím guessing that this occured naturally over the course of its early life.  I am located in the Eastern United States.

After two weeks of searching, I found what I thought to be the lost brake pad.  It appears to be made up of two pieces of automobile tire (with cloth chords running through it), which are glued together. The pad is very slightly oversize from the holder and is only held in place by being squeezed between the two low sides of the brake lever.  One end of the lever also has a lip to keep the pad from sliding off while braking.  Iím guessing that the idea is that there is no real force trying to separate the pad from the holder, thus no screws holding it in.

I still have not figured out what is supposed to keep the brake pedal - connecting rod - brake lever assembly from rotating backward too far, thus causing the brake pad to hit the spokes.  I have a couple ideas that would probably work however,  Iíd like to do it correctly, if possible.

As for the belt.  I am still searching for something better than what I have.  After getting it wet one time, it began to fray and deteriorate.  I originally thought that it was made of leather, but it now appears to be made up of a thin layer of fabric which is continuously wound and glued to give it its WIDTH, not thickness.  This means that when the fabric started to unglue, it reduced the width of the belt and caused it to slip.   Any help with the correct belt cross section would be very helpful.

Regards,
Steve



Larger view HERE
« Last Edit: 22 Sep 2005 at 12:02 by Dave »

Offline Dirt Track

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Re: 1913 Brake and Drivetrain question
« Reply #4 on: 15 Sep 2005 at 05:29 »
G'day all
Did this bike come from Tasmania?
There used to be a similar machine in the Launceston Motor Museum some years ago.
The Vintage Motor Cycle Club of UK have a brake block service...not sure if they stock Douglas blocks but I suspect they might, also they have large blocks of "Retarding Medium" that you can carve a brake block out of...the block is about 6inch x 6inch x 1inch.....not sure of price.
Howard.

Offline Ian

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Re: 1913 Brake and Drivetrain question
« Reply #5 on: 25 Sep 2005 at 00:34 »
Here is a photo of a veteran brake I saw at the veteran rally in SA



Larger view HERE



Larger view HERE



« Last Edit: 23 Nov 2005 at 00:48 by alwyn »

Offline spandau

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Re: 1913 Brake and Drivetrain question
« Reply #6 on: 26 Sep 2005 at 18:24 »
Dirt Track:  Thanks for the VMCC information.  I purchased the bike from a dealer in Austrailia (Sidney, I think), but I'm not sure where it originated from before that.

Ian:     Thanks for the pictures.  I'll take a closer look at mine when I get home.


Regards,
Steve

Offline graeme

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Re: 1913 Brake and Drivetrain question
« Reply #7 on: 12 Oct 2005 at 05:29 »
Steve,
This is the standard brake set up for the veteran Douglas. On my father's bikes we have fitted brake block material purchased from the UK VMCC, as suggested by Howard. Then shaped the material to fit into the housing - if you remove the old material you will find that the flanges on the base of the housing angle inward to clamp onto the block. As added security, we have used self-tapping screws into the block from the rear of the housing, with flat washers to stop the screws pulling through holes in the housing.
The return stop for the block is on the brake pedal - it has a step on the pedal sleeve and a pin in the bar that the pedal pivots on.
And to answer Howard - I am sure that this is the machine that was in the Launceston museum. It was for sale when I visited there in 2001. There was also the basis of a ladies model to go with it - did you get this as well Steve?
Cheers, Graeme

Offline spandau

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Re: 1913 Brake and Drivetrain question
« Reply #8 on: 12 Oct 2005 at 10:46 »
Graeme,

The foot pedal definitely has a step in it however,  I don't remember any type of pin or hole where a pin would go.  I'll have to take a closer look.

The bike did come with some extra parts, including a very rusted front end however, there was no frame with it.  It would have been great to get the ladies model.  I imagine that it is extremely rare.

Thanks,
Steve