Author Topic: 1919 Douglas 4hp Restoration - The Mummy!  (Read 1016 times)

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Offline donnh

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1919 Douglas 4hp Restoration - The Mummy!
« on: 25 Oct 2019 at 22:02 »
The Mummy has been exhumed! After 30+ years in a garage I acquired this motorcycle from a friend of a friend who determined that he was never going to get around to restoring it.


The previous owner acquired the bike when he lived in Ireland and shipped it to the US with all his belongings sometime in the 70's.  Before putting the bike in a container he carefully painted everything with some kind of yellow paint and the meticulously wrapped everything in masking tape. It sat that way for decades until I took it off his hands. The picture above is how I found it in his garage.

The first order of business was looking for the frame and engine numbers so I could properly register the bike in the US. My lovely assistant (and wife) and I set about carefully peeling tape with a heat gun and pliers looking for the numbers.



The frame number is 8380 and the engine number is 7573.

So the journey begins.....
I have some experience with old bikes including a couple of Norton restorations under my belt. I'm a fairly competent mechanic but well aware of my limitations. I might be over my head on this one and am hoping for help from this forum. I've been spending time on various forums trying to learn about the Douglas motorcycles and where to source parts.

I've decided to go a step at a time.... I'll post my progress here, the good, the bad and the ugly.

Comments and suggestions welcome and encouraged.

More to come,
Donn

Offline 9triton

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Re: 1919 Douglas 4hp Restoration - The Mummy!
« Reply #1 on: 26 Oct 2019 at 03:26 »
ha - great story to start with the masking tape.

did it come off smoothly ? I  know when you leave it it all goes hard and rips off in little strips.

Offline midman

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Re: 1919 Douglas 4hp Restoration - The Mummy!
« Reply #2 on: 27 Oct 2019 at 01:38 »
Well the masking tape is a new one. I wonder what the reason for that was?
Good luck and keep us posted.

Chuck

Offline donnh

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Re: 1919 Douglas 4hp Restoration - The Mummy!
« Reply #3 on: 28 Oct 2019 at 19:49 »
Thanks for the replies! Good to know someone is out there....
I have absolutely no idea why the tape was applied, I didn't press it with the seller. Yes, it is hard to remove. I decided to only remove what is necessary and the rest will come off when I have the paint stripped in a tank.

Offline donnh

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Re: 1919 Douglas 4hp Restoration - The Mummy!
« Reply #4 on: 28 Oct 2019 at 20:33 »
Like most projects, getting started can be the hardest part. Where do I begin? During my research I came across Vintage Fenders in Australia https://vintagesteelfenders.com/

Let's see..... need fenders?? Ummm, I think so.


It turns out Andrew and Michael have experience with Douglas motorcycle fenders (or Mudguards as they call them down under) so after many e-mails back and forth with pictures and measurements I placed my order and received the front fender.

 

It's a thing of beauty, they do great work. They are still working on the rear fender and belt guard, and I hope to see that in the coming weeks. It's not like the bike is going anywhere soon.  :)

One question for the group.....
The top bracket on the original fender has a bend in the tabs, my new fender has straight tabs.



In e-mails with the guys at Vintage Steel, they thought the brackets should be straight but then they sent me another e-mail saying another customer had a fender with the bent brackets. Does anyone on this group have a similar bike that could look at the tabs???

Sooo... what's next? Ha, everything! I'm thinking of working on the seat pan next.





Ideally I would like to find a fabricator that could use the old pan as a pattern. I've been searching around the Seattle, WA area and am coming up short. Any ideas out there? My neighbor has a plasma cutter and my wife has metal forming tools.... maybe I could give it a shot?? Not sure.

More to come,
Donn