Author Topic: Dragon fly clutch release  (Read 283 times)

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Offline Kev Dog

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Dragon fly clutch release
« on: 21 May 2019 at 22:33 »
I think the person who worked on his bike before me jammed the clutch, or didn't put it together correctly.
I've separated the motor and the transmission, and can turn the flywheel by hand (no cylinders or pistons mounted.)

The lever to release the clutch is very stiff. I can pull it up with my fingers to a certain point, then it stops. If I try to use a lever to push it up higher, it does not give, and I'm afraid I'm going to break something.

Before i go putting the trans and engine back together, then assemble the top end, it would e nice to know that the clutch is working.

Any tips?



Kev

Offline Doug

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Re: Dragon fly clutch release
« Reply #1 on: 22 May 2019 at 02:29 »
Kev,

Something quick to try before delving deeper. make sure the cam ramps and rollers for the clutch release have a little bit of oil on them. A spritz of WD40 will suffice. normally they are lubed by a small amount of grease escaping from the clutch release thrust bearing. If the rollers are dry, or have the rollers have flats and are skidding, a little oil can make the difference between two-finger operation and something that feels like it is going to pull the clutch cable in two.

-Doug

Offline eddie

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Re: Dragon fly clutch release
« Reply #2 on: 22 May 2019 at 07:23 »
Kev,
         Also, while you have the gearbox off, check that you can move the clutch pressure plate (screwdriver between the pressure plate and flywheel). If the clutch has had early type asbestos free linings fitted, they may have given off some dust which has been known to cause clutch problems when it gets built up on the guide pins through the flywheel, causing them to seize. Linings made of the later woven material (like the original Ferodo) don't seem to cause the same problems.

Regards,
                Eddie.

Offline Kev Dog

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Re: Dragon fly clutch release
« Reply #3 on: 24 May 2019 at 16:38 »
Last night I pulled off the pressure plate and checked out the clutch. It is a newly bonded clutch with Ferodo materiel.
the clutch actuator moves freely on the rollers till it starts pushing against the springs, as it should. All the components look nice, new or reconditioned.

With a lever I can push the actuator further and see the studs push and see the distance pieces come through just a bit.

I bolted up the clutch and pressure plate, I guess I'm going to need to try this with the clutch cable, because with a pry lever on the clutch actuator, I can't get the pressure plate to move out at all and free the clutch at all. It does move the ring on the actuator,  it does start to push , there is more room to go on the ramps against the rollers, I just can't move it any further.

Could he clutch fiber be too thick? It just seems that when you bolt up the clutch it pulled out those studs a bit, like it's the end of their travel.

kev

Offline eddie

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Re: Dragon fly clutch release
« Reply #4 on: 24 May 2019 at 17:16 »
Kev,
        The cllutch driven plate should be .312" thick. When you re-fit the pressure plate, it should nip up on the driven plate before the shoulders on the pins meet the pressure plate. Complete tightening of the 6 nuts compresses the springs a little more, and also takes the load off the release mechanism. If you look into the inspection window, you will see the operating arm is in 2 pieces. With the clutch cable connected and the cable adjuster wound out about 4 turns, the arm can be adjusted to give about .1"of free movement on the cable. The cable adjuster can then be used for final and running adjustments. When running the bike, there must be some free movement on the cable or the release mechanism will be under constant load which will result in premature wear of the actual bearing (as well as being the cause of clutch slip). If you have worries about the clutch operation, fit the cable and lace it up to the handlebar and clutch lever - you can then operate the clutch before re-fitting the gearbox. With the clutch lever pulled in, the driven plate should be free enough to be spun by hand.

  Regards,
                 Eddie.
« Last Edit: 24 May 2019 at 17:24 by eddie »

Offline Kev Dog

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Re: Dragon fly clutch release
« Reply #5 on: 03 Jun 2019 at 16:27 »
Thanks Eddie, the clutch is exactly .312!

 

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