Author Topic: Non starter  (Read 5553 times)

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Offline Stuart Lister

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Non starter
« on: 07 Jun 2005 at 23:24 »
Hello again,

My EW is now fully rebuilt and ready to go. Only one problem remains; I cannot get the engine to start.

I have checked and rechecked the ignition timing, and it is gapped properly, and the points start to open at 45 degrees btdc when fully advanced. Spot on. Still wont start. I get a big fat spark from my newly rebuilt magneto, and I know I can't test for a spark under compression, but it will jump a 6mm gap out of the engine, so I think the spark factory is healthy.

I have double checked the valve timing, and the scribe marks line up, and all the valves open and close exactly when the book says they should. I am getting a reading of 60 psi on my compression gauge, and that seems about right for a side valve engine from the 1920s.

The carburettor is an AMAL. Not correct for the bike I know, but it's the same as the ones that Douglas were fitting to 350 side valves in the early thirties, so it should work OK on mine. The float valve works, the main jet is not blocked, and I can't think of anything else to check in there.

I'm running out of ideas now. Perhaps I've timed it on the wrong stroke, but it still won't start with the plug leads crossed over.

The only thing I can think of is the spark plug. I'm using a Champion D16, which seems to have a very short thread. It doesn't screw directly into the combustion chamber, but goes into a recess which has a hole through into the combustion chamber. The thread on the Champion is not long enough for the electrode to reach this hole. In fact it leaves it around "  short, so I am worried that it is sparking away in there, but not actually coming into contact with any fuel. When I take the plug out, it is always completely dry, even though the face of the inlet valve is wet with petrol. I wonder if this plug is too short? What sort of plug should I be using? (Pitman's recommend a Lodge H1, but I can't find any data to tell me the length of thread or the protrusion of the electrode on this. The Douglas parts book lists a KLG, but no model number. Both these manufacturers are long gone) What about getting an 18mm to 14mm adapter and using a more modern plug with a nice long thread and protruding electrode?

Or maybe it's got nothing to do with the plug, and I've overlooked something else (wouldn't be the first time.) My thinking has dried up. Can anybody help?

Thank you,
Stuart

Offline Ian

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« Reply #1 on: 08 Jun 2005 at 00:48 »
I use NGK A6 which are readily available for my TS. They work fine and are the right length for it.

Offline trevorp

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engine wont start
« Reply #2 on: 08 Jun 2005 at 06:48 »
put a bit of fuel say 5 ml in one spark plug hole with plug removed and refitt plug and try make sure its only a small amout otherwise the eginge could hydraulic, as in lock up eg bend rods smash pistons bend cranks


then try and start if it almost goes u have a fuel problem if it still doesnt even fire once u have a timing or spark issue

it sounds to me like a fuel problem as the plugs come out dry
even though this method is not completely safe it is better than pouring fuel in carby or manifolds

my bet is float level to low or blocked pilot jet

Offline Stuart Lister

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« Reply #3 on: 08 Jun 2005 at 15:09 »
Thanks for the spark plug info Ian. The NGK A6 is reputedly a direct equivalent to the Champion D16. Same thread, reach, etc. So that put my mind at rest about that. If it works in your engine, it should work in mine.

I never did summon up the courage to pour neat petrol in Trevor. All that talk of bent conrods was a bit too scary for me. I have however managed to get it started, and the sorry tale goes like this.

I spent all day yesterday going back to basics, and I found that the valve timing was out. I set this up properly, and reset the ignition timing, but it still wouldn't start. I discovered today that this was because the petrol filter had clogged up. Petrol was flowing fine to begin with, but sometime during all the messing about, it ceased to flow, so when it still wouldn't start, I assumed it was because I still hadn't got to the problem. Not that a new problem had jumped in behind me. It starts first or second kick every time now, though it doesn't want to run for more than a float chamber full, and it doesn't tick over, but these are minor problems, and all part of the game. I'll fix those in time, I was just glad to hear it run.

Thanks again for yor input,

Stuart

Offline trevorp

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did start
« Reply #4 on: 09 Jun 2005 at 10:24 »
glad to hear it finally breathed fire just remember not to be in to much of a hurry to let it idle keep the idle up a bit whilst it is new
say 800 rpm till everything beds in a bit