Author Topic: Petrol and oil tank divider  (Read 2468 times)

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Offline steveale

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Petrol and oil tank divider
« on: 14 May 2015 at 17:26 »
Any recommendations on insuring the integrity of the fuel and oil tank separation baffle?  Aside from fabrication a new tank is there a way to compartmentalize the 2 sections to insure no breach between the tanks?  One thought is to cut the tank open weld in 2  plates with a space between then then weld the tank back together.  Of course proper safety precautions of neutralizing the tank from fumes etc. before fabrication.

Has anyone done this and have any pictures?

Offline Clive

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Re: Petrol and oil tank divider
« Reply #1 on: 14 May 2015 at 21:01 »
Hi Don't try and weld an old petrol tank you will blow yourself up!!!!!!
solder is the time old way no naked flames use large soldering irons solid copper, electrically heated or ones heated away from the tank with a clean heat source. The tank will need steam cleaning for hours to remove all combustable gasses , best to leave the job to an EXPERT.
Regards
Clive

Offline eddie

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Re: Petrol and oil tank divider
« Reply #2 on: 15 May 2015 at 12:46 »
Steve,
          As Clive says - the early Douglas petrol/oil tanks were constructed from tinplate and soldered together. The last piece to be fitted was the base of the petrol compartment - so should be the first piece to be removed to effect a repair! On removing the base, you will find that the divider is staggered (it is longer on the oilpump side than the LH side). With the base removed, you should be able to see if there are any problems with the soldered seams. Most problems occur where the divider is soldered to the top of the tank, so any problems with oil dilution only occur when the machine is in motion and the petrol slops backward and forward. If a seam has started to part, the metal in the seam will probably be too dirty/corroded to make a good repair, so you may need to back up the joint with sections of angle formed from tinplate and soldered into place before replacing the base of the tank.
  Good luck with the repairs,
     Regards,
                   Eddie.

Offline steveale

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Re: Petrol and oil tank divider
« Reply #3 on: 18 May 2015 at 13:35 »
Thanks for the info gents.  I do take repairs on tanks very seriously...I have done several on more modern tanks.  I take them to a specialist here in the usa, they "boil out" the tanks in an alkaline vat which removes all corrosion and any distillate that might remain.

Eddie, I am trying to get the mental image of assembly.  with the bottom of the tank removed was the baffle soldered to the top and sides first?  Then was a line/puddle of cold solder laid on the bottom of the baffle, heat applied to the skin of the tank thus completing the "seal" of the baffle to the bottom of the tank?   Then the edges of the tank are sealed along the edge of the tank bottom?....

just can't visualize the assembly order.  As always, thanks for your insights.

Offline eddie

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Re: Petrol and oil tank divider
« Reply #4 on: 18 May 2015 at 14:17 »
Steve,
          The top, sides and narrow front panel are usually folded up from a single sheet of tinplate, and then soldered up to make the skin of the tank. The curved joints at front and back are sometimes backed up with angles formed from strips of tinplate. At this stage, the 4 anchor points with their reinforcing plates, the mounting plate for the oil drip feed, and the petrol and oil fillers are soldered in. The oil compartment is then made up as a base and stepped divider (if you look at the bottom of the tank, you should be able to see a witness of the shape of the divider), and soldered around the base and to the sides and top of the tank to complete the oil compartment. The oil pump body and tubes for the gearchange and feed pipe from the drip feed are then added. The base of the petrol compartment (along with an anti-surge baffle and bosses for the petrol tap and a drain tap) is then soldered in to complete the whole assembly.
   There are some differences between the early and late tanks, but the method of assembly is much the same.

  Regards,
                 Eddie.