Author Topic: changing rear tube  (Read 1820 times)

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Offline steveale

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changing rear tube
« on: 26 Oct 2014 at 15:59 »
I took possession of a 1913 Douglas yesterday.  I have a copy of the working instructions but it does not identify how to remove/repair the rear tyre.  The tube is leaking around the stem.  I know nothing about these bikes and don't want to damage anything.  Can anyone tell me how the rear wheel is removed for servicing?  Can the tube be replaced properly with the wheel on the machine?  I'll put up another thread with all the information on the motorcycle, it is registered pioneer veteran.  Here is a pic.  it is crusty but nearly completely original.




Offline steveale

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Re: changing rear tube
« Reply #1 on: 26 Oct 2014 at 18:04 »
ok, I got it.  Firstly, I am not as thick as it might appear.  After the post I realized that changing the tube on the machine was a silly question.  Anyway, I removed the pully to get the belt off only to realize that was not required.  I have the new tube in and it's holding air.  I have consulted a psi chart regarding clincher motorcycle tires and have it aired accordingly.  The bike is reassembled, oiled, fueled and ready...I am going to review the operation instructions and give it a go!

Offline graeme

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Re: changing rear tube
« Reply #2 on: 26 Oct 2014 at 23:15 »
In removing the rear wheel, no doubt you will have found that it is necessary to remove the rear brake block to get the wheel out - with the belt pulley in situ! Five minute job, quite straightforward. I run the tyres at 40 psi, but I know there is a lot of debate about this. Having seen the results of a couple of tyres coming off rims over the years on rallies, I am willing to sacrifice comfort for safety.

 

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