Author Topic: Exporting.  (Read 2654 times)

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Offline george sutton

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Exporting.
« on: 15 Sep 2014 at 07:31 »
 Hi guys, long time make no smoke signals.  How ever, my bike is for sale on ebay.  I now have a potential customer who needs to know how much to ship it over  to the United States ? I do not know myself costs for, shipper , import taxes,duties payable, nor insurance cost to cover jouney. Seeing as our Dougies are all over the world,  Can someone please help and advise on this ?Denis.

Online Doug

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Re: Exporting.
« Reply #1 on: 15 Sep 2014 at 22:31 »
Denis,

I presume you are shipping UK to USA? Just as a rough idea I had a S6 shipped from the UK to the USA (east coast) in 2005 for about $1100 and in 2007 an Endeavour for about $1300. These were prices 'door to door', that is they are picked up and delivered at each end by a trucking firm; you do not have to go down to the docks to drop-off or collect the crate. If you can, that would be cheaper, but I think the 'door-to-door' option added about $400. To me that was well worth the money as I did not have to get someone in the UK to haul it to the docks, and I did not have to visit the docks at my end (the destination) to figure out who I needed to bribe to release my crate! For me it would have meant driving to New York City or Baltimore, two unsavory places to drive to. It is better that the shipping arrangements are made by the buyer and not the seller, as there will be power of attorneys required so that the broker can clear the item trough Customs and you will have hopefully been paid by then and technically no longer the owner. Also the duty and taxes are payable at the time the shipment enters the country, so you really do not know the exact amount in advance.

It is recommended that you use a broker specializing in "Less than Container Load" or LCL. Just do a Internet search for Freight Forwarding, LCL; or many are now listing under Household Removers. Some have on-line quoting systems; but I found that when getting quotes last year from AU to USA, many of those just defaulted to contacting a representative anyway. All of whom invariably returned my request for quote, were helpful, and interested in the business. The broker will handle all of the details for the LCL, finding a container heading to your nearest port, getting your crate into that container, forms, finding the trucking firms (if using 'door-to-door'), working with the Customs agent, etc. It will clear quicker too, since the Customs agent and the brokers are use to working with each other. As a one time private shipper if you did your own paperwork it will receive more scrutiny and hence delay. The key is to have it clear in less than five days. The first five days are free, after that you get charges storage fees in the bonded warehouse, and these can be hundreds of dollars per day. Two weeks and you might as well abandon your item. Again, you as the seller can get some preliminary quotes, but the buyer should be making the shipping arrangements.

A few other points. Any crating material entering the USA must be 'pest free'. You can research the standard online at the US Customs and Duty website, but basically it means any solid wood needs to be baked and then a special stamp affixed to the crate. Shipping firms sell these crates in pre- made sizes. If you build a crate, this is o.k. (as of 2007) but it must be entirely of 'processed wood'. This means plywood, chip board, MDF, etc. If you need timbers, it is o.k. to glue up strips of plywood to make thicker beams. I believe the UK has similar requirements for incoming wood crates. Ignore this and you crate will not get in the country, and they will probably tip it overboard on the way back across the Atlantic!

As I mentioned above, duty will be assessed upon entry into the country. If your declared value (or insured value, whichever is higher) sounds reasonable, they will probably just use that. There are tables on the Customs website as to the percentage duty charged based on the type or classification of goods. I do not remember the codes, but in your case there are two categories of interest: motorcycles and motorcycle parts. If the bike is disassembled you can declare it motorcycle parts and the duty is slightly less.

The last thing I can think of is that it will be extremely helpful to the buyer in the USA for registration purposes if you include the frame number on the bill of lading as the VIN (Vehicle Identification Number). This might negate calling it motorcycle parts, but I do not think Customs and the various State departments of motor vehicles talk to each other! When the buyer goes to register the bike he/she can use the bill of lading as proof that the vehicle was imported. Getting titles generated for older vehicles is getting more difficult and expensive here in the States. Too many people have abused the process by registering new replicas as vintage vehicles to avoid current emissions and safety standards, and to take advantage of the cheaper insurance for antique vehicles. Also antique vehicles (and new ones) are stolen or sold without transferring the title (which is when the State collects their vehicle transfer tax) and re-registered in another State under a new title. But altering the VIN number on old vehicles is much easier, hence they get stolen out of someone's barn and pop up later in another state with a new frame number. So without title from you own State or an out of State title to transfer in, your options are becoming increasingly limited. In fact it has become a real pain in the arse. The local State does not care if it was stolen overseas (beyond their jurisdiction), so proof of importation works fine!

-Doug


[fix typos. 15Sep14. -Doug]
« Last Edit: 15 Sep 2014 at 22:41 by Doug »

Offline george sutton

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exporting
« Reply #2 on: 16 Sep 2014 at 08:43 »
 Hi Doug,  ref; my question over exporting. Many thanks for your very informative reply,  wow what a lot of palaver!will pass  this back to the prospective buyer.    Really , I don't want the bike to leave the country,  ideally, I even want it to stay within the club.    Ebay has to be my option because I'm sure I wont get the money I need selling within the club ?  even at the listed price ,I'm looseing a hell of a lot on the sale.  I know, ive had the joy, and satisfaction, of getting the bike back to good health after 4 years of work, but now MY health has let me down. and she has to go, ( the bike ,not the wife ). Many thanks again Doug regards Denis.

Online Doug

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Re: Exporting.
« Reply #3 on: 16 Sep 2014 at 16:04 »
Denis,

Yes, it is quite complicated. That is why most folk use a broker, unless you are going to export/import on a regular basis and want to learn how to do it yourself. Then there are things like having the VIN on the bill of lading that you find out about after you have shipped, and you attempt to register the bike at it new home (after it is too late!) You will not learn that from the broker, because they are not involved with vehicle registrations.

I understand the golden rule of restoration is you are lucky if you get you purchase price and expenses for parts and supplies (out of pocket expenses) back out of the sale. Unless you got the bike very cheap. Forget about compensation for time and labor, you end up working for pennies and hour. If you pay specialists to do restoration work for you (if you do not have the skills or equipment), you will dig a financial hole that you will not recoup. That is why the only way to view it is as a hobby. Folk that buy and sell bikes as a business just cannot afford to put the time and effort that you would into a restoration, and hope to make a profit. They too try to sell globally, as you are doing, to go where the market is the strongest.

It is a shame that we wear out generally before our toys do! Or at least the bikes can be rebuilt several times with a lot less trouble.

-Doug

 

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