Author Topic: the spares scheme  (Read 3207 times)

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Offline shuswapkev

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the spares scheme
« on: 14 Apr 2014 at 11:03 »
 I have caught bits and pieces of a spares scheme in some of the posts...I understand I need to become a member of???

is there any listing what is available??  esp for an EW...

Offline David Lawrence

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Re: the spares scheme
« Reply #1 on: 14 Apr 2014 at 12:08 »
Hi shuswapkev,
Regarding the spares service you mention, this is the one run by The London Douglas MotorCycle Club for use by members sited all over the world,
The Club does try to carry important spares for as wide a range of models as possible. Particularly those which wear out or are often missing or unusable when bikes are found for restoration. Sadly we cannot cater for all requests!
To use this service you do need to belong to The Club, details of membership and how to apply can be found on the Club site douglasmcc.co.uk the cost is at the moment only 18-00 a year which covers a bimonthly magazine, information like the machine register (about to be circulated at the end of this month) and helps finance the spares service as well as the day to day running costs of the Club. So not expensive!!  :D
Having recently gone through a major reorganisation the stock list is not yet published, however an email to the "spares man" will result in a rapid reply! The drive sprocket of which you ask may well be available.
Dave

Offline eddie

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Re: the spares scheme
« Reply #2 on: 14 Apr 2014 at 18:14 »
Hi Shuswapkev/Dave,
                                I think you will find the engine sprocket on the EW is combined with the outer sleeve for the clutch bearing and the flange for mounting the clutch disc - the whole thing being case hardened. The clutch plate is then riveted to the flange. Changing the clutch plate to one with a less worn sprocket may be an easier option - welding up or replacement of just the sprocket will probably result in softening of the bearing track.

  Regards,
               Eddie.

Offline Vermont-Ian

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Re: the spares scheme
« Reply #3 on: 16 Apr 2014 at 17:47 »
"Regarding the spares service you mention, this is the one run by The London Douglas MotorCycle Club for use by members sited all over the world,"
Well almost.  I understand that the LDMCC still will not send spares to us members in North America, because of insurance/liability concerns.  So we get to make our own, or otherwise improvise.
Ian Stokes
Richmond, Vermont, USA
1948 Mk III
1936 Citroen 'Traction' 7C

Offline shuswapkev

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Re: the spares scheme
« Reply #4 on: 18 Apr 2014 at 03:54 »
thanks heaps for your help...boys

  the clutch drive sprocket..are there any alternatives??  for repair..??    cutting the hardened teeth off shouldn't be to big of a challenge...first a grinder,  then ceramic cutter on my lathe... shrink a new sprocket over...and tig it bit by bit....here and there to control the heat
  what alternatives are there....??   to make a new one looks like a real challenge..fairly complicated bit of work...
I have seen a few later bikes that have had the gearbox drive sprocket welded on as a repair...and again the new sprocket worn right down...as well as quite a few cast iron brake drums...and I would think most of these bikes would have maybe 10 times the power that littly dougie has..

Offline cardan

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Re: the spares scheme
« Reply #5 on: 18 Apr 2014 at 05:19 »

Remove old, shrink on new, used solid carbide drill to drill holes on the join in, say, three places, then rivet in place - the "scotch key" principle?

Leon

Offline oily bloke

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Re: the spares scheme
« Reply #6 on: 18 Apr 2014 at 09:29 »
Mine was completely shot when I got the bike. Machined the teeth off, shrunk on new blank and had a mate Spot tig until seamed all round, having made a jig to hold it all square, leaving to cool between spots. Hardening was not effected. As a belt and braces fix you can use heat absorbant putty do reduce the heat transfer.
Cheers
Andy

Offline shuswapkev

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Re: the spares scheme
« Reply #7 on: 18 Apr 2014 at 12:49 »

  sounds like a plan..either the scotch key or the tig....  thanks heaps for your enthusiasm...

  carbide drills...nearly bought a set...until I looked real close...they looked very suspicious... sure they would drill so quick right thru a file...but..looked to me like the cheap masonry bits I use...for less than a dollar each...
 kept my hands in my pockets..
 went home ....got out a few worn out bits ....let the green wheel do its magic...chucked into the drill press..and...WALLAAHH
 drilled thru a  3/8 hole right thru a file...no trouble at all...then sharpened up a smaller one and drilled the primary chain tension shoe on my 51 A10...as the chain had worn deep grooves in it...riveted on a chunk of WMH40 plastic bushing material..
the only problem with masonry bits is the hole size is a bit of trial and try again...or maybe lucky...I just turned up some brass rivets to fit my holes

Offline cardan

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Re: the spares scheme
« Reply #8 on: 18 Apr 2014 at 23:20 »

Real solid carbide drill bits are lovely - correct size and all - but expensive!

Leon