Author Topic: help needed to identify engine  (Read 2046 times)

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Offline aero nut

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help needed to identify engine
« on: 12 Jan 2014 at 19:05 »
hi all  :) :) :)

i am a new be  to this forum  :question: :question: :question: :question: :question:

i have just got this engine  and have been told it is a douglas aeroengine / drone engine ....

hoping someone on the forum may be able to tell me more about it ...

looking for tech specs and so on

regards







« Last Edit: 15 May 2014 at 21:50 by Dave »

Offline eddie

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Re: help needed to identify engine
« Reply #1 on: 12 Jan 2014 at 20:38 »
Hi Aero Nut,
                   The EH prefix engines were fitted to the 1927/28 Douglas model SB27 motorcycle. These engines are 600cc. Douglas also  produced a version for use in industrial trucks. I have looked in books by Jeff Clew and Brian Thorby but cant find any reference to these units powering any aircraft - but this doesn't mean they weren't used - there are a couple of references to earlier 4HP (600cc) engines being fitted in aircraft.
   Hope this is of some help,
          Regards,
                       Eddie.

Offline aero nut

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Re: help needed to identify engine
« Reply #2 on: 13 Jan 2014 at 15:11 »
 :D :D :D :D

Hi Eddie

thank you so much for the info

this engine has both a mag  and a dizzy ......
and a very strange imlet manifold .....

 I am thinking of   using  it in a cycle car  project ... just need to find dizzy cap and mag cover and a few bits  ..

are these engines total loss oil systems ????? 

thanks again

Bruce



Offline Doug

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Re: help needed to identify engine
« Reply #3 on: 14 Jan 2014 at 01:26 »
Bruce,

It started as a standard motorcycle engine, to which a distributor and a few other piercings have been added to the timing cover. The very top of the timing cover has been cut off; it had a false front effect that covered a little of the arch of the inlet manifold. The inlet manifold is homemade and probably dates to when it was being converted for Aero use, though it sort of appears that the conversion was never completed.

The engine has a total loss oiling system. Some of the extra holes in the timing cover look as if to tap into the oil galleries on the inside face of the timing cover.

 -Doug