Author Topic: PETSEAL  (Read 18505 times)

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Offline classicbike99

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PETSEAL
« on: 27 Jul 2010 at 12:20 »
Hope someone can help. I restored a tank and added petseal (the single pack type)
This seemed to take a long time to dry so I left it a week before adding fuel. After a few days I got a weep of fuel.
I drained and let the tank dry for over a week. I then added petseal ultra (two pack type). I let this sit for 4 days before using fuel. The solution dried in the jug I used for pouring it into the tank.
There is now another weep at the same place, today I have drained the tank again and find the inside somewhat sticky.
What are my options, can I get petseal remover that will remove all the seal or look for a new tank.
I have been told this product has a shelf life and am unsure how old the first application was.
This was not on my Douglas but a Norton tank.

Offline Dawn

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Re: PETSEAL
« Reply #1 on: 27 Jul 2010 at 12:46 »
Hi,

Firstly to let you know that you are not alone in your fuel tank worries.  To get rid of the petseal in the tank I have known folk to rinse the tank out using some nuts & some of your missus cleaning products (sorry don't know which one).

Being a member of the Vintage racing forum (VMCC) - have found out others are having problems especially if you have fibre-glass based tanks.  Here is a quote from that site - don't know if it will help or confuse but it may provide an interesting discussion topic.

"JUST RECENTLY I EXPERIENCED PROBLEMS WITH THE USE OF SHELL V MAX plus Millers C.V.L. AT THE BOB MAC MEMORIAL MEETING.
IT SEEMS THAT THE AMOUNT OF ETHANOL SHELL IS CURRENTLY RETAILING IN THEIR FUEL HAS INCREASED SINCE THE 1st JUNE.
THE END RESULT IS IT IS DISOLVING THE RESIN ON THE TANKS INTERIOR & MIXING WITH THE FUEL,CAUSING ENORMOUS PROBLEMS.
I KNOW I AM NOT ON MY OWN WITH THIS PROBLEM,OTHER PEOPLE AT THE SAME MEETING WERE HAVING SIMILAR DIFFICULTIES."

& someone replied with:
 
"This problem is something that has been evident in the US for many years, and is caused by the alcohol content in modern fuels permeating the chemical cross links of polyester resin systems, and causing resins to degrade.

The long term solution to this is to use resins which have higher levels of chemical resistance, which mean problems can be avoided entirely. However the fact that such resins are slightly more expensive, means many small scale producers are even today still using general lay up resins which are completely unsuitable for fuel tanks, and which will in time almost certainly fail.

If the fuel has not penetrated the laminate itself (and caused it to soften), there is every chance of being able to deal with this type of problem, and even in cases where the laminate has softened its sometimes possible to save the damaged tank for a lot less money than a new replacement.

Astonishingly even though there are a reasonably wide selection of "tank sealing" products on the market, some are not resistant to alcohol bearing fuels, and none have been properly tested under controlled conditions, and there are even some products on the market which are solvent based, and require solvents to be evacuated from tanks before full cure can be achieved!

Also there is a tank sealer, used in aviation, that effectively slush molds (liquid swilled around mold until it sets - its how they make plastic footballs, etc) a plastic bag inside the tank - can't remember its name but it is occasionally advertised. The 'bag' holds the fuel, the tank remains provide the structure - apparently it works for hole riddled metal tanks. I am sure someone will know what I mean and that the manufacturers will know how to deal with your tank."

Also the forum mentions having to dry the inside of your tank before & after applying sealant by forcing air into the tank - think the easiest way would be to use a hair dryer of some sort but ask permission before use.

Good luck!

Dawn
 
 
 

Offline classicbike99

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Re: PETSEAL
« Reply #2 on: 27 Jul 2010 at 13:24 »
Thanks Dawn since my request I have now discovered that the first coating mayhave been TANK seal and not PETSEAL. Maybe this will cause a problem with removal. I have ordered a PETSEAL remover so may give it a go. I will keep the post updated.

Offline richson

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Re: PETSEAL
« Reply #3 on: 27 Jul 2010 at 14:08 »
Hi,

I've used petseal on four tanks so far. One was brand new, two were sound but rusty on the inside, and one which was very rusty with several leaking seams. No problems apart from the leaky one, which continued to leak and ruined a very nice paint job. A second application fixed it, and it is still ok three years down the line. I find that it takes about a week to go off completely and remember reading that a thin application takes longer to cure than a bulk of the stuff - something to do with the chemistry.

Offline eddie

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Re: PETSEAL
« Reply #4 on: 27 Jul 2010 at 14:31 »
Resin based products can be very effective but they need to be applied to a clean tank. Applying it to a layer of rust means it will only be fixed as well as the rust layer is to the skin of the tank. Also, most resin based compounds tend to shrink as they cure - causing the newly applied lining to want to pull away from the inside of the tank. They also make it very difficult to effect a repair on any part that is of a structural nature which will need welding or brazing - such as mounting bosses or the petrol tap fittings.
     If you are trying to repair a metal tank - be it steel or tinplate - a better solution is to dent the tank in the area of the leak. Then 'tin' the area of the dent using Fry's solder paint (available from most body shops) and then fill the dent with plumbers solder. The solder can then be filed back and any imperfections filled with normal body filler. I used this method to seal a Dragonfly tank that had rusted through where water had been trapped behind the knee pads - that was 15 years ago, and there is still no sign of any leaks.
                               Regards,
                                        Eddie.

Offline classicbike99

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Re: PETSEAL
« Reply #5 on: 27 Jul 2010 at 15:43 »
Thanks Eddie, I sent the tank for painting thinking it would be checked, there were no obvious holes to be seen.
The petrol showed once tank was painted. The tank was clean inside and out. I think the first batch was out off date.

Offline roy

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Re: PETSEAL
« Reply #6 on: 27 Jul 2010 at 16:04 »
Hi, I purchased a POR 15 M/C Tank Repair kit from Frost Auto. It contained Marine Clean to remove the gum/ varnish that builds up inside over time. Metal Ready which removes rust, etch`s the surface leaving a Zinc Phosphate coating ready to apply the sealer included in the kit.
I used this on the tank of my EW some 5 years ago and have had no problems since.
Roy.

Offline Chris

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Re: PETSEAL
« Reply #7 on: 27 Jul 2010 at 17:19 »
Hi Roy and all
   Your comment is very encouraging as I have just purchased the POR15 MC Tank Repair System from Frost Auto to seal the repaired tank I am using for my current 2.3/4hp restoration. It is more expensive than the product I have used previously. This was "Flow Liner", a glossy white two pack product and this was nearly twice the price of Petseal. However, two tanks sealed about eight years ago and six years ago now have the white liner separating from the inside of the tank and both tanks are now leaking. I am hoping that the POR 15 will be more permanent. Chris.

Offline Ian

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Re: PETSEAL
« Reply #8 on: 27 Jul 2010 at 22:46 »
Over time I have used a number of different sealants on tanks - the only one which has been totally trouble free is the POR15 - as long as you follow the instructions to the letter I think you will be very pleased with it.

Offline graeme

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Re: PETSEAL
« Reply #9 on: 28 Jul 2010 at 03:24 »
Ian, do you know if POR15 is what Kevin used on my tank when he repaired it? If so, it didn't work - the paint bubbled the instant I put fuel into it, and has subsequently bubbled in several other spots as well. I've had no long term luck with any of the tank sealers I've tried - particularly on soldered tanks.

Offline Ian

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Re: PETSEAL
« Reply #10 on: 28 Jul 2010 at 03:33 »
Not sure what he used - I can only go by my experience ! The sealant in the tank on my OC is not POR so I suspect yours isn't either. He does use it now.

Offline classicbike99

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Re: PETSEAL
« Reply #11 on: 28 Jul 2010 at 12:32 »
Update, This morning I checked the tank and found the stickyness had gone??. Is it possible that its the petrol causing the stickeyness.
Plus has anyone ever used the Petseal remover. My worry now is due to my tank being painted will the remover damage the paint. I am told its the fumes that displaces the seal.  Thanks to all for their input.

Offline roy

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Re: PETSEAL
« Reply #12 on: 28 Jul 2010 at 17:47 »
Hi Ian, quite correct, I should have mentioned that you must follow the instructions to the letter, also I used a hair drier to harden off the sealer.
Roy.

Offline Edin

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Re: PETSEAL
« Reply #13 on: 29 Jul 2010 at 11:19 »
Hej
For more than 20 year, I have used a product for tank sealing,- with the name "SCOTCH-CLAD 776" on about 25 petroltank without one single leak  afterwards.
The product is made from 3M. and is exelent.
It is importent to do the cleaning indside the tank very carfully before sealing.
The cleaning can be done from old nuts and broken glas.
The glasbits can be made from a hardened car window,- broken to bits,- with a hammer on a floor
Pour about 2-3 liter of nuts and glasbits in the tank and close all openings.
Shake tank by hands,- for sometimes long time,- (make your arms very long) - until indside is free from
rust and shells.
Wash with petrol and seal after description
I recomend sealing in two step,-
1 step with sealing diluted to about SAE 10-20 - then empty tank and let dry
2 step undiluted,- empty tank and let dry with a little ventilation indside tank from compressorair or blower.
Leave tank in normal position for about 24 hour with ventilation indside
If you have access to a lathe,- is it possible to do the inside cleaning (on very dead slow) on this machine.
Foto show how to do
Good luck and regards from Edin DK








« Last Edit: 29 Jul 2010 at 20:22 by Dave »

Offline Dave

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Re: PETSEAL
« Reply #14 on: 29 Jul 2010 at 20:22 »
Photos added to Edin's post.

Offline classicbike99

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Re: PETSEAL
« Reply #15 on: 29 Jul 2010 at 20:38 »
Thanks for reply. I use a heavy length of metal chain to clean the tank, it is easy to remove a length of chain once finished.

 

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