Author Topic: Book - "Douglas Light Aero Engines from Kingswood to Cathcart"  (Read 7470 times)

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Offline Dave

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Brian has sent in some more information regarding pricing and how to order a copy.




Printable PDF of the above



Offline Brian

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 Redcliffe have the book in stock now (22nd January2010).
 Thanks to all who have pre-ordered.

Brian    


Quote of previous post removed - Dave, 7th Jan, 2010
« Last Edit: 25 Jan 2010 at 17:32 by Brian »

Offline Brian

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The book is now in print, and therefore available, at last.
Book thickness is 19mm  and not 16 as some websites have it.
So, nett weight is 654grams.

Best Wishes
Brian

Offline Dawn

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I ordered the book for a birthday present for my Father-in-law.  He's into aircraft but has only heard of Douglas through me.  The book arrived Monday 25th Jan, he loved the book & said he will be the envy of his friedns who do not have the book (yet).  I don't think I'll be hearing from him for some time as he'll be too busy reading & digesting facts/information.

Although I've not seen it yet - I've been told its brilliant.  Well done Brian.


Offline Chris

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I pre-purchased the book and it arrived last week. Congratulations Brian; it is very impressive and essential reading for any Douglas enthusiast. I have always found the early history of Douglas extremely interesting with their foundry beginnings making street furniture castings, lamposts, drain grids and manhole covers then support of the shoe making industry and finally motorcycle manufacture. Even then they diversified over the years into light cars, electric delivery vehicles, factory platform and lift trucks and of course a variety of generator sets. I knew of their involvement with aircraft and indeed have seen some examples in museums but never appreciated the extent of their contribution in this field and the information that Brian has brought together in this book is quite staggering. Well done.   Chris.

Offline Doug

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I've had and read my copy; twice. I think even the dedicated Douglas motorcycle enthusiast will be quite surprised by the number of aero engine models built at Kingswood or derived from ties to the factory. Even more so than than the unacquainted aviation enthusiast, who would be unaware of Douglas' sometimes precarious financial situation. Up to 1935 the motorcycle models that influenced the offerings are quite obvious. After that the engines became more purpose built, especially those C.G. Pullin went on to design for J.G. Weir in Scotland. It is amazing, with money so tight, just what the factory got up to, even at one point in the later thirties building the entire airframe for light aeroplanes!  Like the industrial motors (but more exciting) this is a whole other aspect of our favorite marque that everyone has heard a little about, but never the whole story. You will find this book fills a significant gap in the standard Douglas history, The Best Twin. From the mid-thirties till the Second World War, one would have got the impression from previous Douglas histories that the Works was in hibernation by the way they breeze over it to get to the postwar models. But in fact quite a lot of activity was going on, as this book now shows. Unfortunately none of the aviation activities helped the bottom line, and the pending war killed the light aviation market. 

The history of Douglas and Weir, as pertaining to their aero efforts is covered in detail. Weir, if you did not know before, was a pioneering UK firm in the field of autogyros and then helicopters. And a Douglas designed and built engine powered the first of these in 1932. It amazes me what information still survives after all this time, if you have the patience to track it down and piece it all together. And this is what Brian has accomplished, bringing it all together in one place. Each engine model is covered with photos, specifications, and/or drawings; the airframes they were fitted to with three-view drawings were possible; and even the competitors engines that Douglas were selling against in the light weight market.

If you like Douglases and Douglas history, you will be delighted with this book I am sure.

-Doug

Offline Brian

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I was surprised, and pleased, to find that my book has made it onto EBay.Au ....via " Aphrohead Books Australia" and "the original evoshop" who sell it at $31.35 AU plus only $1.99AU postage within Oz.Somehow they have a cheap way of shipping books from UK.   Just entering the full title of the book under the "Books" category brings these sellers up. I hope this piece of news does wonders for my sales.

Best Wishes
Brian

Offline Doug

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Brain,

The most economical way is via bulk container load. So I would get on to your publisher and ask him where are those royalties from that last big shipment!

-Doug

 

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