Author Topic: WW1 era Douglas'  (Read 3599 times)

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Offline RobDR

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WW1 era Douglas'
« on: 14 Sep 2009 at 13:12 »
In around a years time i'm going to be looking to buy a First World War era Douglas (up to 1918 and anything before that acceptable). How widely available are both the solo 2 3/4hp and the larger 4hp models, and how much do they tend to sell for?

Offline eddie

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Re: WW1 era Douglas'
« Reply #1 on: 14 Sep 2009 at 13:21 »
Rob,
        What is your location? Values tend to vary country to country.
                               Eddie.

Offline RobDR

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Re: WW1 era Douglas'
« Reply #2 on: 14 Sep 2009 at 15:20 »
Hi Eddie, i'm in the UK which I imagine would help somewhat? Although looking on the forum it seems there's a lot of early Douglas' out there

Offline Chris

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Re: WW1 era Douglas'
« Reply #3 on: 15 Sep 2009 at 06:16 »
Hi Rob
There are two basic designs of WW1 2.3/4hp models. The first design used a frame with a small diameter steering head, a narrow petrol tank with the filler caps on the left hand side and front forks generally described as "Veteran Forks" constructed from tapered oval tubing. This model was still in production or at least leaving the factory up to 1919. However, in 1916 Douglas introduced three new models "U", "V" and "W" having a modified frame, a wider petrol tank with filler caps on the right hand side and front forks constructed from round parallel tubing. The two designs appeared to run concurrently for about three years. I have photographs and illustration of WW1 despatch riders in uniform mounted on either design. Peculiarities of the machines illustrated in service include the fact that the vast majority of these have a single large diameter gas headlamp mounted high on the handlebar, three small toolboxes, one on the right and two on the left hand side with the front one mounted at a slight angle, (I have found no explanation for this and it would have been just as easy to have mounted it horizontally. (Although, illustrations of the 1916 models as introduced by Douglas in 1916 show them to have the large toolboxes as fitted to the 4HP models). Another feature is a leather leg shield which I am convinced was fitted locally in workshops "in Theatre". The logic for this assumption is the fact that although almost universally fitted they vary in shape some having a round hole to admit air to the front cylinder for cooling while others have the hole square and also the corners of the shield may be cut square or have a radius at each corner. Frame numbers of machines produced between 1914 and 1918 may be expected to be in the approximate range of 14,000 to 40,000.
Chris.

Offline RobDR

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Re: WW1 era Douglas'
« Reply #4 on: 18 Sep 2009 at 21:46 »
Hi Chris, many thanks for the interesting reply - a friend of mine in Belgium has a WW1 Douglas, 1915 I believe, although don't know the specifics, especially as to frame numbers etc, but I hope to see it next year. Still undecided as to which model i'd prefer, although I think i'd get more fun out of a 2 3/4hp solo. I personally prefer the look of the Douglas' with the small diameter headlight mounted lower down which is probably how i'd finish mine.

Do any of the photographs/illustrations of your show give any hint as to any markings applied or paint schemes (difficult to tell in a black and white photo I know!) other than the colours seen on civilian Douglas'?

Cheers, Rob

 

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