Author Topic: EW Forks  (Read 6692 times)

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Offline Clive

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EW Forks
« on: 11 Apr 2008 at 01:18 »
I Purchased these forks thinking they would fit my EW ,they check out in every respect except the steering column and crown can anyone tell me which model they fit.
Regards
Clive

« Last Edit: 11 Apr 2008 at 07:26 by Dave »

Offline Alan Cun

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Re: EW Forks
« Reply #1 on: 11 Apr 2008 at 08:43 »
Hello Clive, I like others will be confused by the view what we really needed to see was a side on view Now the TS and CW forks have spindle bolts with an internal squre under a grease cap of about 9/16 thread size. All the lock nuts behind the cap are 20 TPI. Now the other end, small end is a 26 TPI nut as is the spring securing nut. TS forks have  C holes forward of the top link bolt for the front brake. CW forks have a hole and thread between the fork legs about 5 inches above the axle.

Now to deal with EW onwards the lubrication is through a nipple in the centre of the shackles. All shackle bolts and spring nuts are 20 TPI. EW handle bars are part of the rear top rear bolt steering tube section, where CW and TS bars go down the steering tube like a bicycle. regards Alan

Offline Clive

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Re: EW Forks
« Reply #2 on: 11 Apr 2008 at 21:48 »
Thanks Alan,
Its the steering column thats not EW the rest all is . This column does not have mounts for headlight brackets and the horizontal spindle is directly below the column EW normally behind the column centre line  so no access for control cables as spindle bolt blocks the  centre of column.
Regards
Clive

Offline Doug

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Re: EW Forks
« Reply #3 on: 22 Apr 2008 at 04:12 »
Clive,

I printed out a copy of this picture and have been looking at it from time to time, but have to confess the steering stem continues to flummox me. I have not yet figured out anything Douglas that quite fits the bill. When Douglas changed the design and placed the lower spindle bolt directly under the center of the steering stem, they spaced the fork blades out much wider than previously. It is possible that someone has cut down such a later stem (circa 1934 and onward) in width to suit the EW style fork blades, links, and springs seen here.

But the upper link anchorage argues against that for several reasons. The 1934 style had adjustable handlebars, the clamps for which grasped either side of the stem, inboard of the links. The forging step up slightly to a machined diameter. Here the forging steps up to make a purposeful larger shoulder for the links to bear against. This suggests the width has not been modified, or at least not by very much. Were it an EW through A31 top forging, one would see the boss on the back side for the brazed on handlebars. For the 1934 style, the back had a pair of lugs for a pinch bolt and it was of course split to enable it to clamp the stem, all of which would be visible. Also it would have the lug for the central compression spring on the opposite side that could hardly escape notice. There is no obvious evidence this forging has been modified.

Of course there are a few models in between the A31 and the 1934 style that it could have borrowed parts from, but I do not think so. The heavyweights like the S6~D31 used a forging where the spindle continued to be forward of the stem, and the T6~E31 continued to use the old style stem of the 600EW (much like the EW with sockets for the headlamp irons) to exhaust stocks. The lightweights as far as I know continued on with the EW pattern till the new design in 1934. I can also rule out Bantam and F/G31 OHV models.

The other thing that suggests it is a bodge cannibalized from other make parts is there is nothing visible to lock the upper forging to the stem to stop rotation between the to. It does not use the long thread of the EW pattern with the bearing adjuster sleeve and jam nut, with the top forging nutted down firmly to that. Nor the split clamp and pinch bolt of the 1934 and later system. Here the upper nut/stem cap can be run down presumably to set the bearing pre-load, but there is nothing further to really clamp the forging rigidly to the stem.  Perhaps there are some keys and keyways or a spline hidden inside the upper forging, in which case it certainly is not from Douglas.

So unless I am overlooking some obscure Douglas model, my vote is the stem and top forging are from something else other than Douglas.

-Doug

[technical edit, 22apr08, Doug]
« Last Edit: 23 Apr 2008 at 02:50 by Doug »

Offline Clive

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Re: EW Forks
« Reply #4 on: 22 Apr 2008 at 05:32 »
Thanks Doug for all that research.  yes you are probably right some one has cut down the lower casting width to fit the EW links and so fit EW forks to a later model.
I thought i had made a great find as the rest of the forks blades etc are in very good condition . The forks on my EW are to say the least are not perfect , been repaired and straightened many time over the years . The one part i was really after was the steering column, the one i have in my bike is seriously comprised due to the lower casting being badly corroded which i repaired years ago but still at the back of my mind so always on the look out for the as new component . better luck next time .
Once again
Thanks
Regards Clive  P/S am still having great reads on the Patents CD 

Offline Doug

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Re: EW Forks
« Reply #5 on: 23 Apr 2008 at 02:48 »
Here are some pics of the Douglas steering stem upper and lower cross-tree. As used on the 1934 and on heavyweights, and then most of the lightweights by 1935 (except for the cheapest model, which continued to use up old stock.)

I forgot, but when they moved the spindle under the axis of the stem, they also added a boss for a steering damper. Sort of hard to miss! These particular pics are of a 1936 600cc.

Also I made a correction in my prior post, the diameter steps up, to the turned diameter where the handlebar clamps attach. Not down, as I had it.





-Doug


 

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