Author Topic: EW Clutch removal questions  (Read 11587 times)

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Offline davebarkshire

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EW Clutch removal questions
« on: 08 Jan 2008 at 16:57 »
Now that Xmas is over and we're in the dead zone its time that I got on with the EW. The next task is to remove the flywheel and clean and examine the giblets and find out why it makes a clattering sound.

The outer nut came off as did the springs. There is a largish nut that needs to come off and this is where I'm stuck. I've lashed together a primitive flywheel holder and have a box spanner that fits and I think that its a right hand thread. This is guess work really and I'd just like to check that I'm doing the right thing. The nut doesn't want to shift so should I be more brutal or is there a better way? (I have only primitive tools and skills).

This picture might show the position more clearly. I have since removed the metal plate that was held on be 4 screws. Any pointers would be appreciated.

« Last Edit: 08 Jan 2008 at 18:22 by Dave »

Offline Stuart Lister

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Re: EW Clutch removal questions
« Reply #1 on: 08 Jan 2008 at 17:14 »
Hi Dave,

Yes, it's a right hand thread, you just need to persevere. You might need something a bit more positive than the mole grip on the box spanner though. I use a socket wth a long lever which I then clout with a mallet. Hard. The surprise is usually enough to loosen the nut.

After that, you'll need a flywheel puller, you can buy new ones now from LDMCC.

Good luck,

Stuart.

Offline Doug

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Re: EW Clutch removal questions
« Reply #2 on: 09 Jan 2008 at 02:28 »
Concur, it is usually the shock that loosens it. In fact I would not use a mallet but a hammer. Steel on steel, with nothing to soften the jolt. Even a shot-filled mallet often has too much cushion effect, though by all means try it first, and then move up to a 32oz. hammer! You might find the sheet metal tube socket you have shown is not up to the task. They are rarely heat-treated and tend to revert to round tubing under duress. A proper deep hex socket, 1/2 inch drive, with a breaker bar for a handle (not a ratchet handle) is best. Even better is a electric or pneumatic impact wrench, as used for removing wheel lug nuts on cars. 

Do not put the nut back on with the impact wrench. It does need to be dead-tight, but there is a definite risk of over doing it with the impact wrench and stretching the threads. If you know what you are doing you can use a lower power setting, but the safe bet is to tighten manually. That way you have a feel for how tight the nut is.

-Doug

Offline sidecar willy

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Re: EW Clutch removal questions
« Reply #3 on: 09 Jan 2008 at 06:23 »
The tool you require for this is a 1/2 Whitworth socket. However you will find that a conventional length socket will not reach the nut head. The nut is some 40 mm deep. I took the 1/2 Whit socket to my local blacksmith and had him cut the end of the 1/2 Whit [to give the length required]and weld it on to another unwanted socket [which had a 1/2 "  drive] this tool then gave me the length as well as the 1/2 drive on to my wrench the grip/power I needed to shift the locknut

Bill
« Last Edit: 09 Jan 2008 at 08:04 by sidecar willy »

Offline Roger Gibbard

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Re: EW Clutch removal questions
« Reply #4 on: 09 Jan 2008 at 10:51 »
The tool you require for this is a 1/2 Whitworth socket. However you will find that a conventional length socket will not reach the nut head. The nut is some 40 mm deep. I took the 1/2 Whit socket to my local blacksmith and had him cut the end of the 1/2 Whit [to give the length required]and weld it on to another unwanted socket [which had a 1/2 "  drive] this tool then gave me the length as well as the 1/2 drive on to my wrench the grip/power I needed to shift the locknut

Bill

Dave,
A suggestion for holding the flywheel while undoing the nut - ‘sprag’ the sprockets. 
Position one end of a suitable length of metal tube between two teeth on the engine sprocket and below the centre. 
Position the other end of the tube between two teeth on the gearbox sprocket and above the centre. 
The flywheel will be locked because the primary chain and the length of tube work in opposition.
« Last Edit: 09 Jan 2008 at 19:16 by Dave »
G. Roger

Offline sidecar willy

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Re: EW Clutch removal questions
« Reply #5 on: 09 Jan 2008 at 12:16 »
Ahha...that's a good idea. I will be in   the process of assembling my clutch/flywheel and will have to lock the flywheel so as to get the nut tightened up.

thanks for the tip

Offline davebarkshire

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Re: EW Clutch removal questions
« Reply #6 on: 09 Jan 2008 at 12:31 »
Dave,
A suggestion for holding the flywheel while undoing the nut - ‘sprag’ the sprockets. 
Position one end of a suitable length of metal tube between two teeth on the engine sprocket and below the centre. 
Position the other end of the tube between two teeth on the gearbox sprocket and above the centre. 
The flywheel will be locked because the primary chain and the length of tube work in opposition.

Unfortunately the primary chain is no longer moving with the engine because the clutch springs have been removed so the engine is not 'locked' to the chain. I will remember the metal tube idea as it will no doubt come in handy for something else.
« Last Edit: 09 Jan 2008 at 19:15 by Dave »

Offline Ian

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Re: EW Clutch removal questions
« Reply #7 on: 09 Jan 2008 at 22:51 »
I made up the pictured tool to hold the flywheel on my OC - and use a socket from an air tool (deeper reach) for the nut with a long 1/2" drive bar or torque wrench for doing up. No hammering needed !!

« Last Edit: 10 Jan 2008 at 02:42 by Dave »

Offline davebarkshire

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Re: EW Clutch removal questions
« Reply #8 on: 10 Jan 2008 at 07:24 »
That looks perfect for the job! I've had a few more attempts and have failed. Has anyone ever made any of these tools up for the club? If so please let me know. I would have thought that there would be a good demand for them.

Offline davebarkshire

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Re: EW Clutch removal questions
« Reply #9 on: 13 Feb 2008 at 06:51 »
Eureka! as they say in California and a big thanks to Chris Wright for sending a DIY EW flywheel removal kit to the rescue.

The next step is to identify what I have and to work out if anything needs working. I'm used to more conventional clutches and am trying to work this one out in my head. There are a few photos that show the parts that came off. I seem to be missing the part that is marked C on the CW diagram which I'm using as a rough basis.



If anyone has any comments about the giblets shown in these photos please let me know. Maybe I just need to put some grease on the bearings and put it back? Maybe there is something missing? Maybe I should boil any grease out of the frition plate?..... your comments are welcome....







« Last Edit: 13 Feb 2008 at 07:53 by Dave »

Offline Alan Cun

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Re: EW Clutch removal questions
« Reply #10 on: 13 Feb 2008 at 08:16 »
Hello Dave, You will definately need the washer with the two lugs. The large washer sitting on the end of the crank looks to me like an unnecessary addition and may be the cause of slipping and burning. I am sure there will be much appreciation for the views of the CW clutch. As they say a picture is worth a thousand words. Good one. Alan

Offline Chris

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Re: EW Clutch removal questions
« Reply #11 on: 13 Feb 2008 at 09:34 »
      From the illustrations provided above, the differences between the CW and EW flywheel clutches will have become apparent. The CW clutch has a combined radial and thrust bearing track to take 1/4" diameter balls machined into the central hub riveted to the pressure plate upon which is riveted one friction lining. The driven plate has the sprocket riveted to this and rotates over the ball race. The second friction lining is riveted to the back plate itself secured to the rear of the flywheel by means of Qty 8 countersunk head 7/32" Whitworth screws.
      The EW clutch is the reverse of this in having the friction linings riveted back to back on the driven plate. This acts between the pressure plate and back plate which are smooth. It has roller bearings between the hub and the sprocket and the thrust component is provided for by a separate thrust bearing comprising originally, a brass disk with captive steel bearing balls and now being substituted in many cases by the "Oilite disk".
       In both clutches, the drive dog is essential to prevent relative rotation between the pressure plate and the flywheel body. The other difference that prevents the two mechanisms being interchangeable is the fact that the crankshafts of the two models are of different diameters with the EW being larger and so the tapers in the flywheel body are different to suit. The drive dogs are also different on the internal diameter to reflect this fact. The flywheel clutch on my TS started life as an EW clutch. I machined a new hub from a huge billet of stainless steel to incorporate the combined radial/thrust ball race and riveted it to the EW pressure plate, machined out the (damaged anyway) taper from the flywheel and shrank in a new centre with the correct taper. drilled the pressure and back plates to take new friction linings and spun a new dished plain driven disk to which I riveted the sprocket. It all works perfectly.    Chris.
 

Offline davebarkshire

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Re: EW Clutch removal questions
« Reply #12 on: 28 Apr 2008 at 14:50 »
Now that I have the missing part it has been time to put the flywheel back together. I now just about understand how the clutch works although it still seems a little cryptic.

Upon reassembly I tightened the nut that holds the flywheel onto the shaft (hand tight) and found that the sprocket did not turn that freely although it does turn and maybe at engine speed this would not be an issue. I used just 4 of the 6 springs and have them only slightly compressed just to see if the clutch works. It doesn't seem to do anything still. Does anyone have any ideas? Are there any experts anywhere North Devon?