Author Topic: Hills and EW's  (Read 7016 times)

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Offline bazza

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Hills and EW's
« on: 06 Dec 2007 at 07:24 »
Hi All,The VMCC of Australia has a rally coming up in February and they mention that there are a lot of steep hills on the run can some of you who have this marque give me some idea of the performance of an EW on hills,I'd like to go in this rally that of course if the bike is ready by then.

Bazza

Offline Chris

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Re: Hills and EW's
« Reply #1 on: 06 Dec 2007 at 08:10 »
Hi Barry  You should have no problems on hills with the EW. This model has much improved power and performance over the CW model which was the last of the conventional 2.3/4hp models. My CW has ascended the notorious Sunrising Hill on the Banbury Run without faltering although I did need bottom gear. The only concession that might be necessary in an extreme case is that you might need a clear run as the ability to re-start on a very steep incline might be problematical.  Chris.

Offline roy

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Re: Hills and EW's
« Reply #2 on: 06 Dec 2007 at 10:17 »
Barry, I concur with Chris, you should have no problems with the EW, I surmounted Sunrising in this years Banbury with no problems. Go for it.  :D
                                             Roy.                 

Offline Ian

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Re: Hills and EW's
« Reply #3 on: 06 Dec 2007 at 21:35 »
Barry, I presume you are talking about the Wongawilli one ? It normally goes up Mac pass and down Jamberoo or similar. As long as the EW is operating properly it should have no problems. The real problem with that run is older style brakes coming down ! One guy will do it on his 1911 single speed Norton though.

Offline bazza

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Re: Hills and EW's
« Reply #4 on: 07 Dec 2007 at 00:24 »
Ian,Yep thats the one suppose could always carry an anchor and throw it out if I strike a problem but the brakes seem to be ok as we have relined them and all the parts are new but then again no guarantees eh!!!

Bazza

Offline Ian

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Re: Hills and EW's
« Reply #5 on: 07 Dec 2007 at 00:42 »
Your brakes will be OK - plus you have a gearbox !!

Offline davebarkshire

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Re: Hills and EW's
« Reply #6 on: 07 Dec 2007 at 09:56 »
Where I live is notorious for steep inclines and my normal riding takes place on this terrain. We have some of the famous testing hills that were sought out in the 1920s (Porlock, Lynton, Beggars, Countisbury etc) so a 1 in 4 with a sharp bend at the bottom is fairly normal here. Because I don't have the EW on the road yet I can only offer some generic observations for machines from the 1920s.

Going up is usually not a problem with late vintage machines with gears and a healthy engine and taking it easy in first is better than labouring in second. You shouldn't need the clutch. Some like to give a squirt of oil before starting the ascent although depending up on the engine design some machines seem to splash more oil when the engine is tilted back (the 350 Enfield for example) so maybe someone can tell us how this affects the EW? You should carry spare plugs just in case you do 'over oil'.

Going down is the one that matters and only you can tell us how good your brakes are and how badly they fade. I try to always descend without using the brakes too much and keep the brakes for stopping at the end or for an emergency which leaves the engine to do the work and depending upon the [incline, weather, traffic, compression, gearing] I'll select either first or second.

Using the engine as a brake can cause a lot of vibration. The Brown & Barlow float need often dances a jig when the revs are high in engine braking mode which creates a flood and sometimes jams the needle 'open' so I'll usually turn the fuel tap off before descending. It is also worth checking everything at the bottom to see if anything has shaken loose. Check carbide mixers, exhaust nuts, petrol/oil caps and all of those small things that can unscrew themselves.

Offline bazza

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Re: Hills and EW's
« Reply #7 on: 07 Dec 2007 at 18:28 »
Hi Dave,How well I remember those hills from my youth in the UK my Dad use to climb those hills in his Austin7 pre war and told me of some hair raising stories.

Bazza

Offline graeme

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Re: Hills and EW's
« Reply #8 on: 07 Dec 2007 at 21:09 »
You'll have no problems Bazza - I've done that run on the veteran 3 1/2hp, and like Ian says, it's coming down Jamberoo Pass that is interesting. Your EW will have much better brakes than the veteran, so should be of no concern.

 

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