Author Topic: EW (and I dont doubt other) clutch matters 'spring' to mind  (Read 6504 times)

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Offline tck

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Working on the pre-war douglas is a voyage of dicovery my 1926 EW was dragging its clutch when I removed the retaining ring on the flywheel and  there was a mess of squashed springs I took off the adjusting nut and discovered 6 springs so I bought some more,then on reading the handbooks I found a reference to 4 springs no wonder the two in the slotted holes in the flywheel went haywire I thought.so I poped in the 4 springs and started to tighten the ajusting nut while holding the retaining washer from turning -and if I cant hold it and the washer turns and over tip the springs at an angle and they have to be straightend up before a further tightning can be attempted I have not even got the nut on a far as it needs to be covered by the retaining ring and Im thinking "there must be a trick to this!", is there?
2 hours later:
Now I am even more perplexed I have another rusty flywheel I belived was also EW that has 6 holes for springs arranged around the central hole (So what price the EW book comments 4 springs?) whereas my EW has 4 spring holes and two holes opposite each other that are sloted to meet the central hole ( U shape). :?
« Last Edit: 24 May 2007 at 20:58 by tck »

Offline Alan Cun

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Re: EW (and I dont doubt other) clutch matters 'spring' to mind
« Reply #1 on: 25 May 2007 at 09:01 »
From Experience, with clutches on EW TO H3 you only need 4 springs.     What you you must ensure is that on the inner side of the flywheel you have good washer with the raised edge about 3 inch diameter The springs sit on this and it shouldnt be distorted.  On the outer part of the flywheel should be an outer spring washer with inner and outer folds.  Now this washer has 2 opposite semicircles that lock against the semicirle dents in the 4 screw hole lock plate.  Now this is where you need to be tricky.   You need longer temporary screws that stops the outer spring plate ring from turning when screwing on the lock nut. The screws can then be replaced by the correct length.  This method should work for you without the springs trying to rotate.    One more thing if your primary chain looks to be adjusted right it is probably too tight causing the inner plate to distort and grab.  I run mine so slack it looks like it should come off.   I also assumed you have fitted the anti rotation washer under the flywheel securing and clutch adjusting stud.   regards Al           PS Have been out to the shed and lined up a few tricks of the trade tools and methods will post comments after picture is added.


« Last Edit: 27 May 2007 at 03:54 by Dave »

Offline Dave

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Re: EW (and I dont doubt other) clutch matters 'spring' to mind
« Reply #2 on: 27 May 2007 at 00:03 »
Photo added May 27 2007.

Offline Alan Cun

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Re: EW (and I dont doubt other) clutch matters 'spring' to mind
« Reply #3 on: 27 May 2007 at 01:02 »
Thanks Dave,  These are some of my tools and methods of dealing with Dougs. The last thing you need with a Doug is for a flywheel to come loose.   The damage caused can result in a complete engine strip to repair. The upper left shows a two pin lever that fits in 2 spring holes of the flywheel and allows heaps of tension to the flwheel securing stud.The O with arms on the flywheeel is a method of compressing the clutch springs to get the adjusting nut started.I think the chains on pipe are fairly self explanitory. If you have ever had a drum sprocket come loose on your bike you will know that the splines or hub can be damaged and you lose the back brake.  This tool  is simply a piece of pipe that fits over the lock ring with a key that fits the slot. A hole is required in the T handle for the axle to go through.  C spanners are a must if you dont want to damage your plating on exhaust and manifold nuts.   Why is that Norton clutch tool shown.  The Norton clutch is my choice to modify for Dougs. The centre of a Doug chainwheel can be easily modified to fit the Norton clutch.  I have Norton clutches fitted to a DT box and also a modified EW box fitted to a 4 HP .This was achieved by making up a Doug look alike dogbone and pulling the spring cover instead of it being pushed through the mainshaft.  Another good thing about the Norton Clutch is being able to fit JAWA speedway plates.      One more observation I have on the flywheel clutch. Maybe when you are building up a motor you are tempted to fit a modern seal on the mainshaft behind the double race bearing.  I would not.   A felt seal allows a certain amount of oil mist to escape from the motor to lubricate the ctutch ,  as does the overflow from the timing chest lubricates the primary chain.   My 600 E29 has a much lightened fly wheel  and it is fitted with 70mm Kawa 1100 pistons  It has a fair bit of torque and hates to stay in second gear.   Might seem a bit rough but my way of riding is to only use the clutch for stop / starting  most changes are therfore done clutch less left arm over the tank. Another thing the primary chain has to slow down to engage first gear, high revs makes it almost impossible, as does a tight primary chain. It would be great if the primary chain would stop but it never happens. Only way to prevent an embarrassing grating noise is to sneak forward towards first and snap it in.  all for now regards Al
« Last Edit: 27 May 2007 at 08:14 by Alan Cun »

 

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