Author Topic: Southern Highlands of NSW - the Towns and Attractions  (Read 8182 times)

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Offline ADCR

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No. 1 of a Series.

Town of Mittagong

Mittagong, is a major township in the Southern Highlands being generally recognised as the 'Gateway to the Highlands'.


The Spring Gardens at Kennerton Green,
Mittagong.
 
The area was once occupied by the Dharawal Aborigines. The first European party to investigate the district was that of ex-convict John Wilson in 1798.

Over the next decade there were minor forays into the district by the likes of John Warby and a botanical collector for Joseph Banks named George Caley. The Hume brothers, probably in the company of their uncle John Kennedy, investigated the area in 1814.

Governor Macquarie facilitated settlement by constructing the Old South Road (1819-1821) from Picton through lower Mittagong and Bong Bong to Sutton Forest and on to the Goulburn Plains.

The first inn, the Kangaroo Inn, was built by George Cutler at what is known as Lower Mittagong on the Old South Rd in 1827.


The Fitzroy Inn in Mittagong, first opened in 1836  
as the 'Travellers Inn"

Explorer Charles Sturt lived in this area in the 1830s, employing Tasmanian bushranger Martin Cash as a dairyman in 1836. Bushrangers frequented the thick scrub of the district from the 1830s to the 1870s.


Cottages in Pioneer Street, Mittagong.


To read more of Mittagong's fascinating history and things to see and do in and around the town visit this website. A comprehensive listing of accommodation houses can be found there too.

Further searchable accommodation listings are available HERE.  Just check your requirements including entering the dates required and then select 'Show Availability'. If your first choice is negative try others.

Maps of townships and villages of the Southern Highlands are available HERE.

A feature not mentioned in the website is Bou-Saada Vineyard and Wines. Cradled in the high ranges above Mittagong, Bou-saada's family-run vineyard offers unique cool climate wines from grapes grown only on the property including Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, Riesling and Merlot. Ask for directions at the Information Centre.

Enjoy a casual Vintner's Lunch by the fireside or outside overlooking the vines - an antipasto platter using all local made products - taste some of these excellent wines and find out more about cool climate wine making.


Bou-Saada Vineyard

This intimate vineyard also grows a variety of stunning proteas that are for sale as cut flowers from March to December.

Below is a road map of the Southern Highlands, the general area in which it is proposed to hold the Douglas Centenary Rally. The freeway bypasses the towns and the main roads servicing the towns and the rural roads around them are ideal for the rally - they are well maintained, safe and traffic is usually light to moderate - and the scenery is unparalleled.

« Last Edit: 10 Nov 2006 at 09:30 by alwyn »
Australian Douglas Centenary Rally
Planning Committee

E-mail: adcr@douglasmotorcycles.net
Snail-mail: ADCR
c/- PO Box 234
VICTOR HARBOR
SOUTH AUSTRALIA  5211

Offline ADCR

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Town of Bowral
« Reply #1 on: 17 Jul 2005 at 08:36 »
No. 2 of a Series.

Town of Bowral

Bowral is a fashionable and attractive township in the Southern Highlands just a few kilometres south-west of Mittagong and only 126 kilometres from the City of Sydney. Once a kind of hill station for Sydney's wealthy, it is now a retreat for those wanting to enjoy city living in the country.


     Corbett Bridge in Bowral - Tulip Time

The Bowral area was first traversed by Europeans in 1798 when ex-convict John Wilson and his party were sent south by Governor Hunter with the aim of accumulating information about the southlands to discourage convicts who were escaping and heading south in the belief that China was only 150 miles away!

Over the next decade there were expeditions into the district by John Warby and a botanical collector for Joseph Banks named George Caley. The Hume brothers, probably in the company of their uncle John Kennedy, investigated the area in 1814.


School of Arts _ Bowral c 1884

Explorers Oxley and Throsby were rewarded with land grants in the area. Oxley was granted 2400 acres in 1823 and was authorised to purchase a further 5000 acres which he named 'Wingecarribee'. The family homestead is still standing.

Wingecarribee House c late 19th century.

The property incorporated part of Mt Gibraltar, called 'the Gib' by locals and 'Bowrel' (thought to mean 'high') by the local Aborigines. It is under the shadow of this rocky outcrop to the north that the present town of Bowral stands.

Mount Gibralter near Bowral

Grazing and cattle-breeding drove the economy. Bowral became, and still is, the commercial centre of the Southern Highlands, as well as a service centre to the surrounding properties.

Today Bowral is a decidedly up-market, some would say ?yuppified?, tourist centre full of boutiques, gift shops, antique dealers, restaurants and cafes, bookshops and art galleries.

al fresco dining Bowral

Bowral is possessed of a healthy climate and scenery reminiscent of rural England. There are a number of excellent municipal parks and playgrounds. With an economy focused on tourism, vegetables, dairying and grazing the current population is over 8000.

...StJudes Church of England Bowral c1887... and  StJudes Rectory c1880 ...

Read more of Bowral's fascinating history and things to see and do in and around the town by visiting this website. A comprehensive listing of accommodation houses can be found there too.

Further searchable accommodation listings are available HERE.  Just check your requirements including entering the dates required and then select 'Show Availability'. If your first choice is negative try others.

Maps of townships and villages of the Southern Highlands are available HERE.

One of the MUST things to visit in Bowral, especially for cricket lovers, is the Bradman Museum.

Bowral's most famous son is cricketing legend, Sir Donald Bradman. The Bradman Museum, located in Glebe Park (follow Boolwey Street  east from the main streets), takes a comprehensive look at the history of cricket, particularly in its early days. There is an interesting display of Bradman memorabilia including the bat he used when he scored 304 at Headingly in 1934. Other items include an oak bat dating back to the 1750's.

Below is a road map of the Southern Highlands, the general area in which it is proposed to hold the Douglas Centenary Rally. The freeway bypasses the towns and the main roads servicing the towns and the rural roads around them are ideal for the rally - they are well maintained, safe and traffic is usually light to moderate - and the scenery is unparalleled.

« Last Edit: 10 Nov 2006 at 09:27 by alwyn »
Australian Douglas Centenary Rally
Planning Committee

E-mail: adcr@douglasmotorcycles.net
Snail-mail: ADCR
c/- PO Box 234
VICTOR HARBOR
SOUTH AUSTRALIA  5211

Offline alwyn

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Re: Southern Highlands of NSW - the Towns and Attractions
« Reply #2 on: 20 Jan 2006 at 05:28 »
No. 3 of a Series.

The Town of Moss Vale

Moss Vale is the beautiful rural centre of the Southern Highlands and home to the Wingecarribee Council chambers.
The town is surrounded by lush farming areas and the spectacular natural scenery of this highland area. Like the other towns and villages in the Southern Highlands, Moss Vale is central to a great array of natural attractions such as Fitzroy Falls, Wombeyan Caves and national parks.

Leighton Gardens in the centre of the town are renowned for their colourful displays of many different blooms and treasured also as a place to relax and enjoy the pleasant climate.

Many homes and other old buildings have been meticulously restored and one of the most extensive and attractive is Tudor House, a preparatory school for boys which welcomes visitors. Other buildings of note and widely appreciated are fine tudor style residences, the memorial fountain and its clock tower, the school of arts, Presbyterian church, railway station and many more.

............
The Old Town Hall built c. 1891, now a private residence and the Memorial Fountain and Clock Tower.

.........
 The Railway Station at Moss Vale and the Station Master's Cottage built c. 1874


Throsby Park, a magnificent colonial mansion built in the 1830's is also available for inspection. The homestead's historic farm buildings, owned by the Throsby family for 150 years, are an interesting illustration of life as an early colonial landholder. The site protects Throsby Park house and associated farm buildings including the former barn, flour mill, the original stables, Gundagai Cottage and Christ Church. It also includes archaeological features, a garden, orchard and farm areas, and a large number of heritage items. Throsby Park is listed on the National Estate, National Trust and State Heritage registers. There is more to learn about Throsby Park here. An inspection provides a wonderful insight into life in colonial Australia and the Throsby family who occupied it for five generations from when it was originally built in the 1830's.

Accommodation in Moss Vale includes motels, guest houses, hotels, country resorts and an exciting working cattle and horse station.

Fully searchable accommodation listings are available HERE.  Just check your requirements including entering the dates required and then select 'Show Availability'. If your first choice is negative try others.

Below is a road map of the Southern Highlands, the general area in which it is proposed to hold the Douglas Centenary Rally. The freeway bypasses the towns and the main roads servicing the towns and the rural roads around them are ideal for the rally - they are well maintained, safe and traffic is usually light to moderate - and the scenery is unparalleled.



Road travel tips:
It takes about 30 minutes to travel from one side of the map to the other (about 15 minutes north to south via the freeway). Details of on and off ramps are outlined on the Road directions page. From Mittagong, Bowral, Moss Vale, or Berrima it is about 10 minutes drive to the next adjacent main town.

From Moss Vale, Sutton Forest is 5 minutes, then Exeter 5, and Bundanoon another 5. Fitzroy Falls and Robertson are each about 20 minutes from Moss Vale or Bowral.

On the Freeway the speed limit is 110 kilometres per hour. Elsewhere limits range from 50 kph (residential areas) all the way up through 60, 70, 80, 90, and 100 kph. Motorists are advised to watch carefully for speed limit signs (which often seem to move location without warning). Patrol cars, unmarked police cars, and radar are used widely.

Beware of travelling at high speed on narrow country roads and lanes. Approach the junction of Illawarra Highway and Sheepwash Road (see map, west of Burrawang) with extreme caution. At roundabouts (there are many) give way to any traffic already in the roundabout (not just on your right); there is no priority of access for cars driving straight ahead through the roundabouts.

Australian Douglas Centenary Rally
Planning Committee

E-mail: adcr@douglasmotorcycles.net
Snail-mail: ADCR
c/- PO Box 234
VICTOR HARBOR
SOUTH AUSTRALIA  5211
« Last Edit: 17 Jan 2008 at 05:02 by Dave »
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Offline PeterH

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Re: Southern Highlands of NSW - the Towns and Attractions
« Reply #3 on: 20 Jan 2006 at 06:21 »
This area looks beautiful - I might come up now! Nearly as nice as tassie. :)
Peter
Sth Aus.

 

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