Author Topic: E29 Restoration Project  (Read 586 times)

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Offline TonyC

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E29 Restoration Project
« on: 27 Feb 2017 at 14:00 »
Hi Folks,

I have just started to restore an E29 Douglas which has been hidden away in a shed for the last 50 years.
On the rear mudguard there are a series of holes which I assume are for a pillion seat, but all the photos I have seen show a rear carrier fitted. Does anyone have a photo of what the pillion seat should look like?
The front brake plate is severly corroded, would this be the same as the back plate.
Also the images of E29`s on the forum recently show the sight glass for the drip feed on a different angle.

Any comments appreciated

Regards

Tony

Online eddie

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Re: E29 Restoration Project
« Reply #1 on: 27 Feb 2017 at 14:43 »
Hi Tony,
              With that loop stay for the rear mudguard, I think you'll find that it is a F29 - not an E29! Also, the slightly different position of the sight glass may be due to the fact it is fitted with the optional electric lighting set, and a little more room was needed for the generator.

  Regards,
                 Eddie.

Online eddie

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Re: E29 Restoration Project
« Reply #2 on: 27 Feb 2017 at 14:49 »
Tony,
          As far as I am aware, the plain brake plate (without the lip that goes over the edge of the brakedrum) came in 2 versions. On the inside there are lugs for return springs and adjusting screws. Some plates had 3 springs, others had 4. Also, the adjusting screws are positioned differently on some plates.

  Regards,
               Eddie.

Offline Foppoli Matteo

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Re: E29 Restoration Project
« Reply #3 on: 27 Feb 2017 at 17:48 »
hello Toni also my rear fender is the same as yours, but no holes for the saddle! and no door parcel|
perhaps a sporty version?????? :question:

Offline Doug

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Re: E29 Restoration Project
« Reply #4 on: 28 Feb 2017 at 00:48 »
Tony,

The E/F28 spares list states the same part number for the front and rear backing plate. I cannot see why the 1929 models would be different.

In 1929 the E/29 kept with the parcel rack as used on the 1927-28 models, but the F/29 had a loop stay like the subsequent S6 models. Footrests were standard for the F28-F29 but I am sure the customer could specify whatever they wanted. 

The timing cover you show is what I associate with the 1927-28 models, and as fitted to my F28. The '29 models should have the Enots sight glass mounted on a corbel of the timing cover. They did make these with the dyno as I have seen two (including Matteo's). They seem much less common than the non-dyno cover. Yet I have seen plenty of 1928 models with the provision for the dyno (even if the dyno had long since been removed.)

1929 cover with dyno:



1929 cover without dyno:



-Doug




[fix typo. 28Feb17 Doug]
[fix typo. 02Apr17 Doug]
« Last Edit: 02 Apr 2017 at 21:21 by Doug »

Offline richard s1

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Re: E29 Restoration Project
« Reply #5 on: 28 Feb 2017 at 23:12 »
Hi Tony
        If you email me a photo of the inside of the brake plate and the brake band I may be able to fit you up with one.
Regards
       Richard

Offline TonyC

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Re: E29 Restoration Project
« Reply #6 on: 02 Apr 2017 at 20:49 »
Attached are some images of E29 & F29 motorcycles from 1929

Tony

Offline Doug

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Re: E29 Restoration Project
« Reply #7 on: 02 Apr 2017 at 22:48 »
Tony,

Those are probably early sales catalog artwork, done in late 1928 before the 1929 models were finalized. And perhaps the first few 1929 models did have the 'old style' timing cover oil drip sight. By the time Douglas got around to printing the handbook covering the 1929 (and '28) models, they show the removable Enots sight glass mounted on a corbel.

-Doug