Author Topic: Antique side car  (Read 1785 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Antony

  • Member
  • *
  • Join Date: Mar 2016
  • Posts: 5
  • Location: New Zealand
Antique side car
« on: 05 Mar 2016 at 08:22 »
Hi guys i recently got an antique motorcyclte sidecar but have no idea what it is off. I get the feeling it may be a Douglas which is why I have come to you guys first. I will attach photos of it.

Offline cardan

  • Master Member
  • ****
  • Join Date: Jul 2007
  • Posts: 673
  • Location: Adelaide, South Australia
    • Leon's Vintage Motorcycle Page
Re: Antique side car
« Reply #1 on: 06 Mar 2016 at 04:42 »

Hi Antony,

With all those triangles, you'd have to be thinking Scott? The attached photo shows a veteran Scott in the Pioneer Run.

Leon

Offline Antony

  • Member
  • *
  • Join Date: Mar 2016
  • Posts: 5
  • Location: New Zealand
Re: Antique side car
« Reply #2 on: 06 Mar 2016 at 04:47 »
Okay thank you so much for that. I will start looking around that community for exact information. Thanks again.

Offline Antony

  • Member
  • *
  • Join Date: Mar 2016
  • Posts: 5
  • Location: New Zealand
Re: Antique side car
« Reply #3 on: 06 Mar 2016 at 05:07 »
Would I also be able to get you guys to take a look at this douglas wherl to identify its model?

Offline cardan

  • Master Member
  • ****
  • Join Date: Jul 2007
  • Posts: 673
  • Location: Adelaide, South Australia
    • Leon's Vintage Motorcycle Page
Re: Antique side car
« Reply #4 on: 06 Mar 2016 at 09:44 »

Make sure you report back when you ID the sidecar - it's an interesting one.

Offline Doug

  • Global Moderator
  • ****
  • Join Date: Mar 2004
  • Posts: 3124
  • Location: Pennsylvania, USA
Re: Antique side car
« Reply #5 on: 06 Mar 2016 at 15:45 »
Antony,

Douglas had a few variations of sidecar chassis design, but none that I have seen quite like this. Particularly the triangulation under the rear cross tube; none of the other Douglas sidecars have that.

A typical 1930 and on sidecar chassis can be seen here:
http://www.douglasmotorcycles.net/index.php?topic=1033.msg3420#msg3420
Though there were some other shapes of chassis frames. This has compression coils in the tubular towers at the rear, prior to 1930 they used leaf springs.

The wheel uses the standard Douglas hub, part #PC8690. Used from 1926 to 1938. Since the wheel shown has a beaded edge rim, it could be for a OC, 600EW, B29, A31, and their derivatives. Colonial models from 1929, and heavyweights from 1930 used the wired on tyres. Douglas used a special hub for cantilevered axles on the sidecar, but they may have used the standard cycle hub on heavy sidecar chassis where the axle was supported at both ends.

-Doug

Offline Antony

  • Member
  • *
  • Join Date: Mar 2016
  • Posts: 5
  • Location: New Zealand
Re: Antique side car
« Reply #6 on: 07 Mar 2016 at 08:07 »
Hi, thank you for the information on the wheel. How much would you expect a 600-ew to sell for at the moment?

Thanks
Antony

Offline Antony

  • Member
  • *
  • Join Date: Mar 2016
  • Posts: 5
  • Location: New Zealand
Re: Antique side car
« Reply #7 on: 15 Mar 2016 at 18:30 »
Hi, thank you guys for your help. I have gotten into contact with the person in that picture through the motorcycle club that the picture was taken at and he has been really great in helping me to find the year of the sidecar.

For those that are interested the sidecar is a 1917 to 1924 Scott sidecar.

Thanks guys
Antony

Offline cardan

  • Master Member
  • ****
  • Join Date: Jul 2007
  • Posts: 673
  • Location: Adelaide, South Australia
    • Leon's Vintage Motorcycle Page
Re: Antique side car
« Reply #8 on: 15 Mar 2016 at 21:50 »

Thanks for the info Antony - its certainly a distinctive chassis.

Leon