Author Topic: please help on my barn find douglas 2 3/4 hp reg 30/8/22 the frame is different  (Read 3282 times)

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Offline Johndunkling

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Found in the loft of a boiler house, i have the old log book and new log book and several letters. The bike was converted to battery power in 1943 and there was a article in motor cycling june 4th 1942 and i have a letter from the editor in july 1943 requesting photos for the mag, but the frame is different to others on your website. i have pics that i can email, what would be the chance of locating engine and tank, kind regards john dunkling

ps in 1943 the lob book was changed showing own make but ser no i dont think changed and is 56592







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« Last Edit: 05 Jun 2012 at 20:59 by Dave »

Offline graeme

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The front forks and wheel, and also the headstock I would think, are lightweight BSA from the late 20s/early 30s. The frame looks very much home made to me - and very light in the tubing at that.
Cheers, Graeme

Offline Johndunkling

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Hi Graeme,thanks regards John

Offline borleyfolksworth

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John
Having had a look at this machine close up now, I am reasonably sure that the Douglas log book does not belong with the metalwork. As someone has observed, the forks are very "Brampton" with the single spring and the frame is unique. However I am confident in saying that this machine has some serious pedigree for it is documented that the first owner built the bike whilst working at Peter Brotherhoods in Peterborough to negate the use of petrol by building an electric unit. The project is very well thought out and was known to be used for daily transport. The Motor Cycling in 1942 did an article on it by non other than the famous Graham Walker who would not have featured it if it was not worthy material.
It must be restored as I consider it has great historic significance.
Regards Colin

Offline cardan

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    • Leon's Vintage Motorcycle Page

I think you'll find the front fork is, as Graeme suggested, BSA. The give-away is that the fork is in one piece even though there are no spindles. The BSA fork design had the bushes attached to the fork links, so the only role of the spindles was to take up side play and stop the links falling onto the road. I reckon "own make" might be a good description of the rest of the frame. Interesting and worth saving.

Leon